extravagance


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To maintain these retainers, and to support the extravagance and magnificence which their pride induced them to affect, the nobility borrowed sums of money from the Jews at the most usurious interest, which gnawed into their estates like consuming cankers, scarce to be cured unless when circumstances gave them an opportunity of getting free, by exercising upon their creditors some act of unprincipled violence.
exclaimed Miss Wilson, angered at such extravagance.
Their eyes burned in their heads; their feet grew speedier and lighter; their whole soul was found up in that fortune, that whole lifetime of extravagance and pleasure, that lay waiting there for each of them.
There was much opposition to such extravagance, and much ridicule.
Have we not already seen enough of the fallacy and extravagance of those idle theories which have amused us with promises of an exemption from the imperfections, weaknesses and evils incident to society in every shape?
Mynniscus used to call Callippides 'ape' on account of the extravagance of his action, and the same view was held of Pindarus.
In spite of the gross flattery and coarseness of this address, Madame Danglars could not forbear gazing with considerable interest on a man capable of expending six millions in twelve months, and who had selected Paris for the scene of his princely extravagance.
But throughout the scene we are in a region of extravagance rather than of true fiction--it cannot be taken seriously by any but the very serious, until we come to the episode of Phemius and Medon, where the writer begins to be at home again.
Darcy chose to doubt it-- or to treat it as a merely conditional recommendation, and to assert that I had forfeited all claim to it by extravagance, imprudence-- in short anything or nothing.
But then all this extravagance is not for myself," added Athos, laughing.
Without much extravagance of eulogy, the spectacle might even be termed splendid; for, according to the fashion of the times, the ladies shone in rich silks and satins, outspread over wide-projecting hoops; and the gentlemen glittered in gold embroidery, laid unsparingly upon the purple, or scarlet, or sky-blue velvet, which was the material of their coats and waistcoats.
Gathering in Green River valley Visitings and feastings of leaders Rough wassailing among the trappers Wild blades of the mountains Indian belles Potency of bright beads and red blankets Arrival of supplies Revelry and extravagance Mad wolves The lost Indian