factor

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Related to extrinsic factor: Extrinsic pathway

Factor

An event, circumstance, influence, or element that plays a part in bringing about a result.

A factor in a case contributes to its causation or outcome. In the area of Negligence law, the factors, or chain of causation, are important in determining whether liability ensues from a particular action done by the defendant.

factor

n. 1) a salesman who sells in his/her own name on behalf of others, taking a commission for services. 2) something that contributes to the result.

factor

(Commission merchant), noun agent, broker, commercial agent, delegate, deputy, envoy, interagent, manager, medium, middleman, one who sells for factorage, proctor, procurator, representative
Associated concepts: consignee, factors' lien

factor

(Ingredient), noun additive, agent, aid, aspect, cause, component, constituent, constitutive element, content, contributing force, determinant, element, elementary unit, feature, integral part, part, portion, segment, unit
See also: aspect, broker, cause, characteristic, component, constituent, dealer, deputy, determinant, element, feature, ingredient, member, part, plenipotentiary, portion, procurator, reason, represent, substitute

factor

1 a mercantile agent. An agent who is in the ordinary course of business entrusted with goods or documents of title representing goods with a view to their sale. A factor has a lien over goods entrusted to him; this lien covers any claims he may have against his principal arising out of the agency. Most factors will be mercantile agents (and have the powers of such) for the purposes of the Factors Act 1889. Under this Act, in certain circumstances a factor may pass a good title to goods entrusted to him.
2 an institution to whom a company assigns its book debts (see FACTORING).
3 in Scotland a landlord or superior's agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
We can then relate extrinsic factors to the ordination scores of stomach samples extracted from the PCA to test whether or not the factors are related to dietary variation.
These factors can be divided into two general categories: intrinsic factors, or characteristics and behavior patterns of infants themselves, and extrinsic factors, including parent behaviors and characteristics of the infant's environment (see also Sadeh & Anders, 1993).
Problems inherent to image interpretation and extrinsic factors that influence the environment of interpretation have rarely been given the attention they are due, yet both need to be addressed.
What intrinsic and extrinsic factors affect the development of anti-drug antibody to innovator infliximab and its biosimilar CT-P13 in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.
Extrinsic factors for ED include antipsychotics, antidepressants and central-acting antihypertensive drugs, which all have the potential to perturb the central neurotransmitter pathways involved in sexual function.
Some of the previous studies (DeConinck & Stilwell, 2004) have studied the relationship of Distributive Justice with extrinsic factors such as pay but not on intrinsic factors.
The agency does not consider any extrinsic factors," said board spokesman Robert Elder.
The international team of scientists said that the diversity was a result of "an interaction between extrinsic factors - historical events that have caused extinctions or provided opportunities for speciation - and the intrinsic characteristics of different lineages that have influenced how they responded to these events".
2) Men and women will report similar intrinsic motivation, but men will be more motivated to participate in sport by extrinsic factors and more prone to amotivation.
The causes for both can range from genetics and extrinsic factors like death in the family, abuse, and anxiety associated with separation and body image," she said.
Two of these are intrinsic and two are extrinsic factors.
This is contrast to the weight of extrinsic factors that may Involuntarily anchor them in place.