factor


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to factor: Factor Models

Factor

An event, circumstance, influence, or element that plays a part in bringing about a result.

A factor in a case contributes to its causation or outcome. In the area of Negligence law, the factors, or chain of causation, are important in determining whether liability ensues from a particular action done by the defendant.

factor

n. 1) a salesman who sells in his/her own name on behalf of others, taking a commission for services. 2) something that contributes to the result.

factor

(Commission merchant), noun agent, broker, commercial agent, delegate, deputy, envoy, interagent, manager, medium, middleman, one who sells for factorage, proctor, procurator, representative
Associated concepts: consignee, factors' lien

factor

(Ingredient), noun additive, agent, aid, aspect, cause, component, constituent, constitutive element, content, contributing force, determinant, element, elementary unit, feature, integral part, part, portion, segment, unit
See also: aspect, broker, cause, characteristic, component, constituent, dealer, deputy, determinant, element, feature, ingredient, member, part, plenipotentiary, portion, procurator, reason, represent, substitute

factor

1 a mercantile agent. An agent who is in the ordinary course of business entrusted with goods or documents of title representing goods with a view to their sale. A factor has a lien over goods entrusted to him; this lien covers any claims he may have against his principal arising out of the agency. Most factors will be mercantile agents (and have the powers of such) for the purposes of the Factors Act 1889. Under this Act, in certain circumstances a factor may pass a good title to goods entrusted to him.
2 an institution to whom a company assigns its book debts (see FACTORING).
3 in Scotland a landlord or superior's agent.
References in classic literature ?
At the sound of the name of Robin Hood, the corn factor quaked with fear, so that he had to seize his horse by the mane to save himself from falling off its back.
This problem is only solvable if we cease arbitrarily to substitute for the unknown x itself the conditions under which that force becomes apparent- such as the commands of the general, the equipment employed, and so on- mistaking these for the real significance of the factor, and if we recognize this unknown quantity in its entirety as being the greater or lesser desire to fight and to face danger.
I grow timid when I am face to face with my human frailty, which ever prevents me from grasping all the factors in any problem - human, vital problems, you know.
Love of the right, desire for the right, unhappiness with anything less than the right--in short, right conduct, is the prime factor of religion.
A client is to me a mere unit,--a factor in a problem.
Says Spencer, in the Preface to his Autobiography:--"In the genesis of a system of thought, the emotional nature is a large factor: perhaps as large a factor as the intellectual nature" (see pages 134, 141 of Vol.
Dunster continued, "how people forget that factor, and yet the man who was responsible for The Hague Conference knew it.
Murder of COLIN CAMPBELL of Glenure, Efq; Factor for His Majefty on the forfeited Estate of Ardfhiel.
The majority of the younger men envied him for just what was the most irksome factor in his love--the exalted position of Karenin, and the consequent publicity of their connection in society.
The art of war, then, is governed by five constant factors, to be taken into account in one's deliberations, when seeking to determine the conditions obtaining in the field.
I mean, if we consider thoughts as factors, may we not say that the Least Common Multiple of all the minds contains that of all the books; but not the other way?
The merchant fishermen at the falls acted as middlemen or factors, and passed the objects of traffic, as it were, cross-handed; trading away part of the wares received from the mountain tribes to those of the rivers and plains, and vice versa: their packages of pounded salmon entered largely into the system of barter, and being carried off in opposite directions, found their way to the savage hunting camps far in the interior, and to the casual white traders who touched upon the coast.