fair


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fair

(Just), adjective aequus, affording no undue advantage, appropriate, balanced, deserved, detached, dispassionate, equal, equitable, evenhanded, fair-minded, fitting, honest, honorable, impartial, merited, objective, scrupulous, sporting, sportsmanlike, square, suitable, uncolored, uncorrupted, uninfluenced, unprejudiced, unswayed, upright
Associated concepts: fair and impartial trial, fair hearing, fair on its face, fair preponderance of evidence, fair representaaion, fair trade, fair trial, fair wages

fair

(Satisfactory), adjective acceptable, adequate, bearable, decent, good enough, mediocre, medium, middling, moderate, moderately good, passable, reasonable, reasonably good, respectable, secundus, sufficient, suitable, tolerable, unexceptional, unobjectionable
Associated concepts: fair aggregate value, fair and equitable value, fair and reasonable compensation, fair and reasonnble market value, fair and reasonable value, fair cash value, fair consideration, fair equivalent, fair market value, fair preponderance, fair return on investment, fair use, fair valuation, fair value
See also: adequate, attractive, average, business, clean, correct, dispassionate, equal, equitable, evenhanded, high-minded, honest, impartial, imperfect, judicial, juridical, just, marginal, market, mediocre, neutral, nonpartisan, objective, passable, right, rightful, scrupulous, standard, unbiased, unprejudiced, upright
References in classic literature ?
The money was paid on the spot, and my new master took my halter, and led me out of the fair to an inn, where he had a saddle and bridle ready.
As I went out at his door I heard him murmur sleep- ily: "Give you good den, fair sir.
When ADAM thus to EVE: Fair Consort, th' hour Of night, and all things now retir'd to rest Mind us of like repose, since God hath set Labour and rest, as day and night to men Successive, and the timely dew of sleep Now falling with soft slumbrous weight inclines Our eye-lids; other Creatures all day long Rove idle unimploid, and less need rest; Man hath his daily work of body or mind Appointed, which declares his Dignitie, And the regard of Heav'n on all his waies; While other Animals unactive range, And of thir doings God takes no account.
uf, will push from his road him who opposes his claim to the fair barony of Ivanhoe, as readily, eagerly, and unscrupulously, as if he were preferred to him by some blue-eyed damsel?
To this the student, bachelor, or, as Don Quixote called him, licentiate, replied, "I have nothing whatever to say further, but that from the moment Basilio learned that the fair Quiteria was to be married to Camacho the rich, he has never been seen to smile, or heard to utter rational word, and he always goes about moody and dejected, talking to himself in a way that shows plainly he is out of his senses.
Let me call back to the desolate gardens the fair forms that are gone, and their soft voices blessing you will bring to your breast a never failing joy.
No doubt a fair amount of climbing up iron ladders can be achieved by an active man in a ship's engine-room, but I remember moments when even to my supple limbs and pride of nimbleness the sailing- ship's machinery seemed to reach up to the very stars.
I bore him fair and strong, hero among heroes, and he shot up as a sapling; I tended him as a plant in a goodly garden, and sent him with his ships to Ilius to fight the Trojans, but never shall I welcome him back to the house of Peleus.
It was late in the day when the train thundered into the ancient city of Vanity, where Vanity Fair is still at the height of prosperity, and exhibits an epitome of whatever is brilliant, gay, and fascinating beneath the sun.
And all with pearl and ruby glowing Was the fair palace door, Through which came flowing, flowing, flowing, And sparkling evermore, A troop of Echoes, whose sweet duty Was but to sing, In voices of surpassing beauty, The wit and wisdom of their king.
For it is strange to see, now in Europe, such huge buildings as the Vatican and Escurial and some others be, and yet scarce a very fair room in them.
From the length of the veil which fell from their pointed coif, twined with pearls, to their heels, from the fineness of the embroidered chemisette which covered their shoulders and allowed a glimpse, according to the pleasing custom of the time, of the swell of their fair virgin bosoms, from the opulence of their under-petticoats still more precious than their overdress (marvellous refinement), from the gauze, the silk, the velvet, with which all this was composed, and, above all, from the whiteness of their hands, which certified to their leisure and idleness, it was easy to divine they were noble and wealthy heiresses.