familiar object

See: landmark
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References in classic literature ?
Then there was the parting from every familiar object,--the place where she had grown up, the trees under which she had played, the groves where she had walked many an evening in happier days, by the side of her young husband,--everything, as it lay in the clear, frosty starlight, seemed to speak reproachfully to her, and ask her whither could she go from a home like that?
At the sight of each dear and familiar object he was profoundly affected.
Whenever the moonlight penetrated there, it showed me some familiar object that recalled my happiest days.
I went on in the direction I thought was south but which I now imagine must have been about due north, without detecting a single familiar object.
The villa and the lady are such familiar objects in London life, that I ought to apologise for introducing them to notice.
But I have also seen his eyes rest fondly upon the faces in the room, upon the pictures on the wall, upon all the familiar objects of that home, whose abiding and clear image must have flashed often on his memory in times of stress and anxiety at sea.
I gazed around at the old familiar objects, at the old familiar grey and gloomy objects.
By great application, however, and after having remained during the space of several revolutions of the moon in my hovel, I discovered the names that were given to some of the most familiar objects of discourse; I learned and applied the words, `fire,' `milk,' `bread,' and `wood.
Tess was in a dream wherein familiar objects appeared as having light and shade and position, but no particular outline.
He inspects slowly all the familiar objects daily touched by her, her books, her girlish ornaments.
And so D'Arnot commenced at once, pointing out familiar objects and repeating their names in French, for he thought that it would be easier to teach this man his own language, since he understood it himself best of all.
For a moment or two he looked about him like a man who had been transported to some strange country in his sleep, but soon recognising familiar objects, rubbed his eyes lazily and might have relapsed again, but that the cry was repeated--not once or twice or thrice, but many times, and each time, if possible, with increased vehemence.