famine


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There must have been an idea more powerful than all the calamities and sorrows of this world, famine or torture, leprosy or plague--an idea which entered into the heart, directed and enlarged the springs of life, and made even that hell supportable to humanity
We are told by historians that widespread famines occurred in those days every two or three years, and such was the condition of things that men actually had recourse to cannibalism, in secret, of course.
Through the struggle against Chaos, in the wake of the Famine, came now another old enemy of humanity-- the Pestilence, the Purple Death.
And as the exhaustion of the mechanical resources of civilisation clears the heavens of airships at last altogether, Anarchy, Famine and Pestilence are discovered triumphant below.
It was remembered that since that date there had not been a single famine.
If there's going to be a famine, and it looks like it, we need every ounce of grub for ourselves.
Ever arose the increasing tale of famine on the Inside.
In the Strait of Magellan looking due southward from Port Famine, the distant channels between the mountains appeared from their gloominess to lead beyond the confines of this world.
Tierra del Fuego, first arrival -- Good Success Bay -- An Account of the Fuegians on board -- Interview With the Savages -- Scenery of the Forests -- Cape Horn -- Wigwam Cove -- Miserable Condition of the Savages -- Famines -- Cannibals -- Matricide -- Religious Feelings -- Great Gale -- Beagle Channel -- Ponsonby Sound -- Build Wigwams and settle the Fuegians -- Bifurcation of the Beagle Channel -- Glaciers -- Return to the Ship -- Second Visit in the Ship to the Settlement -- Equality of Condition amongst the Natives.
This he bound by an oath too shocking to repeat; and after many violent asseverations, concluded in these words: "I am resolved upon the match, and unless you consent to it I will not give you a groat, not a single farthing; no, though I saw you expiring with famine in the street, I would not relieve you with a morsel of bread.
Fortunately for him, at this period so difficult for him from the failure of his book, the various public questions of the dissenting sects, of the American alliance, of the Samara famine, of exhibitions, and of spiritualism, were definitely replaced in public interest by the Slavonic question, which had hitherto rather languidly interested society, and Sergey Ivanovitch, who had been one of the first to raise this subject, threw himself into it heart and soul.
I accompanied the whale-fishers on several expeditions to the North Sea; I voluntarily endured cold, famine, thirst, and want of sleep; I often worked harder than the common sailors during the day and devoted my nights to the study of mathematics, the theory of medicine, and those branches of physical science from which a naval adventurer might derive the greatest practical advantage.