farce

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farce

noun absurdity, burlesque, comedy, dry humor, dry wit, humor, imitation, jest, joke, lampoon, mockery, nimble wit, nonsense, parody, pleasantry, pretense, quick wit, satire, slapstick, spoof, wit
Associated concepts: judgment a farce, travesty of justice, verdict a farce
See also: caricature, parody, travesty
References in periodicals archive ?
Theyre trying to write a farce but, for whatever reason, the farce begins to happen around them," said George Zahora, the Naperville playwright who wrote the show.
I know the word farce from both theater and cooking, and wonder if there is a connection?
I regularly marveled at her ingenious strategies for incorporating references to today's lived realities into her farces while remaining essentially true to the medieval theatrical world from which those farces emerged.
The new comedy farce by TV actors Roger Leach and Colin Wakefield is set in the honeymoon suite of a Birmingham hotel where a conference for lawyers is taking place.
When the franchise farce was first revealed, blame was heaped on civil servants - while we now learn that three civil servants who were suspended over the fiasco have had their suspensions lifted.
He also notes the references to farces throughout Rabelais' work, often by name.
Michael Cooney's comedy delivers slamming doors, a dishonest scheme gone wrong, blatant liars, dead bodies, mistaken identities and men dressing up as women - as they always tend to do in British farces.
1) Three comedies and five farces in which Collette often acted, with his wife and her younger sister Augusta Maria Wilton (1854-1926) are disregarded or covered briefly.
Beam details a case in which the arrival of Calvinist pastors in Amiens combined with economic pressures meant that public gatherings such as farces were considered fertile ground for Reformists.
Beam's focus is primarily the plays and farces performed by university students and the less exalted members of the law courts such as clerks, ushers, and notaries, collectively referred to as the basoche.
The growth of print technology as a way of promulgating farce is also an important topic here, and illustrations that reproduce the frontispieces of farces published by two of the groups discussed in detail (the Rouen confraternity known as the Conards, and the Paris Basoche) are helpfully reproduced.
Rabelais's tales of Gargantua and Pantagruel contain a surprisingly large number of references to farces, and many episodes within the Chroniques are structured with a farce-like framework.