fealty


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There are few more demeaning acts of fealty than an ex-IRA boss raising a glass to the monarch in Windsor Castle.
These cylinders were enduring commemorations of the king's fealty to the gods, and they enhanced the appearance of legitimacy for the ruler with his subjects.
In its response, the Presbytery of Montreal encouraged the government to remove the crucifix saying "the presence of this crucifix gives the impression that the National Assembly grants fealty to the crucified Jesus and to the church that would honour and follow him.
Speaking as an Iraqi war veteran: please do not pay empty fealty to our military service while undermining the democracy our service members fought to protect.
Several of the local English Marcher lords had withdrawn from the king's fealty and were supporting Llywelyn in his campaign in the Usk Valley near Abergavenny.
They believe in British fealty to the US, and parliamentary fealty to the government, every bit as much as the Tory/Lib Dem coalition does.
Reformist groups have been suppressed or sidelined since then and the next president is likely to be picked from among a handful of politicians known for fealty to Khamenei, minimising the chances of political rifts leading to post-election chaos.
Damascus: Main opposition group the Syrian National Coalition yesterday expressed concern at jihadist Al Nusra Front's pledge of fealty to Al Qaeda, warning it would serve the goals of President Bashar Al Assad's regime.
It lives within the patriarch, secures fealty and feasts upon the impure.
They could even quote Edmund Burke's line that a democratic representative owes his electors his best judgment, not a slavish fealty to majority opinion.
On Tuesday, the 43-year-old Malaq was shot dead near his home in Somalia's capital, Mogadishu, by two young men suspected of belonging to Al-Shabab, a group that pledges fealty to Al-Qaeda.
Being himself an academic man, Wilson had the fealty of the intellectuals, for the most part, from the beginning of his first term in office.