feast

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References in classic literature ?
He looked at us, as if he could never feast his eyes on us sufficiently.
he would rather trust to casualties than to his own resolve--rather go on sitting at the feast, and sipping the wine he loved, though with the sword hanging over him and terror in his heart, than rush away into the cold darkness where there was no pleasure left.
They come and sit at our feasts just like one of our selves, and if any solitary wayfarer happens to stumble upon some one or other of them, they affect no concealment, for we are as near of kin to the gods as the Cyclopes and the savage giants are.
All this, set off by the presence of that excellent prince, who was so good-natured, who invented so droll tricks against Monsieur de Chavigny and so fine jokes against Mazarin, made for La Ramee the approaching Pentecost one of the four great feasts of the year.
Equitable feasts were never wanting about my altar, nor the savour of burning fat, which is honour due to ourselves.
They remembered, likewise, the good feasts of London the profusion of ale and sherry with which the citizens of London paid their friends the soldiers; -- they looked with terror at the black war bread, at the troubled waters of the Tweed, -- too salt for the glass, not enough so for the pot; and they said to themselves, "Are not the roast meats kept warm for Monk in London?
These grave and weighty councils were alternated by huge feasts and revels, like some of the old feasts described in Highland castles.
As for triumphs, masks, feasts, weddings, funerals, capital executions, and such shows, men need not to be put in mind of them; yet are they not to be neglected.
Again and again he strove to brace himself up to join the feasts of reason and flows of soul which he knew were taking place nightly around the object of his devotions, but every time he failed.
So they visit their richer cousins, and get into debt when they can, and live but shabbily when they can't, and find--the women no husbands, and the men no wives--and ride in borrowed carriages, and sit at feasts that are never of their own making, and so go through high life.
One day, about a week before one of these feasts, he met the Supreme Gobbler, who said:
They are literally, so far as one can ascertain, feasts of the dedication - that is, they were first established in the churchyard on the day on which the village church was opened for public worship, which was on the wake or festival of the patron saint, and have been held on the same day in every year since that time.