fee


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Fee

A compensation paid for particular acts, services, or labor, generally those that are performed in the line of official duties or a particular profession. An interest in land; an estate of inheritance.

An estate is an interest in land, and a fee, in this sense, is the shortened version of the phrase fee simple. A fee simple is the greatest estate that an individual may have in the land because it is total ownership of the land including all structures attached thereto. It is complete ownership absent all conditions, limitations, or restrictions upon alienation, which is its sale or transfer to another.

fee

n. 1) absolute title in land, from old French, fief, for "payment," since lands were originally given by lords to those who served them. It often appears in deeds which transfer title as "Mary Jo Rock grants to Howard Takitall in fee..." or similar phraseology. The word "fee" can be modified to show that the title was "conditional" on some occurrence or could be terminated ("determinable") upon a future event.. 2) a charge for services. (See: fee simple)

fee

(Charge), noun charge for services, compensation, compensation for labor, compensation for professional service, consideration, cost, disbursement, dues, exactment, expenditure, expense, fare, fixed charge, merces, payment, price, recompense, reward, toll, wage
Associated concepts: attorney's fee, counsel fees, reasonnble fee, splitting a fee

fee

(Estate), noun absolute inheritance, absolute interrst in realty, corporal hereditament, feod, feud, fief, hereditament, holding, interest, land, landed estate, landed property, lands, legal estate, property, real estate, real property, realty, right of possession, title, unconditional inheritance, unlimited inheritance, unrestricted inheritance, vested interest in land
Associated concepts: absolute fee, base fee, conditional fee, contingent fee, defeasible estate, determinable fee, fee simple, fee tail, limited fee, qualified fee
Foreign phrases: Feodum est quod quis tenet ex quaaunque causa sive sit tenementum sive redditus.A fee is that which any one holds from whatever cause, whether it be tenement or rent.
See also: advance, brokerage, charge, compensation, cost, due, excise, expense, fare, honorarium, pay, payment, pension, perquisite, price, rate, real estate, recompense, remittance, rent, reward, tax, toll, wage

fee

in English law an interest in land that was inheritable, but the term is now only relevant in the context of the phrase FEE SIMPLE ABSOLUTE IN POSSESSION. In Scots law, used to denote the full and unlimited right in capital or land that is otherwise subject to the personal servitude of a LIFE RENT.
References in classic literature ?
As Adam lay a-dreaming beneath the Apple Tree, The Angel of the Air he offered all the Air in fee.
On the one hand, of course, I was glad, for the fee was at least tenfold what I should have asked had I set a price upon my own services, and it was possible that this order might lead to other ones.
Nay," cried the other shrilly, "it is but my fee that thou didst pay me, and thou gettest it not back again.
My master desired me to say," the other answered, "that he would be prepared to pay any fee you cared to mention.
The fee that he had vainly refused still lay in its little white paper covering on the table.
If a chemist in New York made a new discovery in say radium, all his expenses across the continent were paid, and as well he received a princely fee for his time.
Bukawai, fearful lest he should lose any recompense, followed Momaya with the intention of persuading her to part with her ornaments of copper and iron against her return with the price of the medicine--to pay, as it were, for an option on his services as one pays a retaining fee to an attorney, for, like an attorney, Bukawai knew the value of his medicine and that it was well to collect as much as possible in advance.
The physicians, therefore, finding themselves anticipated in everything they ordered, were at a loss how to apply that portion of time which it is usual and decent to remain for their fee, and were therefore necessitated to find some subject or other for discourse; and what could more naturally present itself than that before mentioned?
Our fears must have been prophetic, for on that same evening the wildwood discharged upon us Milly's preordained confiscator--our fee to adjustment and order.
I shall then have done what I undertook to do-- and I'll take my fee.
Bless you, my dear Sir, such a thing was never heard of, without a consultation fee being previously paid, and a consultation fixed.
You’d be the very man to take him, Bill, and I'll make out a special deputation in a minute, when you will get the fees.