feel

(redirected from feels)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

feel

verb appreciate, be informed of, believe, conceive, conclude, deduce, glean, grasp, know, labor under, learn, note, observe, perceive, sense, share, sustain, sympathize, understand
Associated concepts: feel positive about the outcome of a case, feel the defendant is guilty or innocent
See also: deem, detect, endure, opine, perceive, suffer, surmise
References in classic literature ?
How friendly such things make strangers feel, don't they?
Perhaps we feel like that when we die and become a part of something entire, whether it is sun and air, or goodness and knowledge.
In consequence of this bad fashion, a man, who is too conscientious to misspend his days among the women, in learning the names of black marks, may never hear of the deeds of his fathers, nor feel a pride in striving to outdo them.
One perceived him to be a personage of marked influence and authority; and, especially, you could feel just as certain that he was opulent as if he had exhibited his bank account, or as if you had seen him touching the twigs of the Pyncheon Elm, and, Midas-like, transmuting them to gold.
He sees no black sky and raging sea, feels not the reeling timbers, and little hears he or heeds he the far rush of the mighty whale, which even now with open mouth is cleaving the seas after him.
You can feel them in the air round about him, capering frenetically; with their invisible feet they set the pace, and the hair of the leader of the orchestra rises on end, and his eyeballs start from their sockets, as he toils to keep up with them.
Mother came at me so that I thought she was crazy, and I was whipped and tumbled off to bed, without any supper, before I could get over wondering what had come about; and, after that, I heard mother crying outside the door, which made me feel worse than all the rest.
He has got more moods, and more different kinds of feelings than other creatures; and, mind you, whatever a bluejay feels, he can put into language.
They epitomize the experience of their fellow-mortal, and pronounce judgment on him in neat syntax, and feel themselves wise and virtuous--conquerors over the temptations they define in well- selected predicates.
She feels out of sorts altogether and hopes nothing is going to happen.
He is an old chum of mine, and feels my pulse, and looks at my tongue, and talks about the weather, all for nothing, when I fancy I'm ill; so I thought I would do him a good turn by going to him now.
Poor old man, he feels very badly because he told me years ago that nothing could be done for Dick.