felony

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Related to felonies: Convicted felon

Felony

A serious crime, characterized under federal law and many state statutes as any offense punishable by death or imprisonment in excess of one year.

Under the early Common Law, felonies were crimes involving moral turpitude, those which violated the moral standards of a community. Later, however, crimes that did not involve mortal turpitude became included in the definition of a felony.Presently many state statutes list various classes of felonies with penalties commensurate with the gravity of the offense. Crimes classified as felonies include, among others, Treason, Arson, murder, rape, Robbery, Burglary, Manslaughter, and Kidnapping.

felony

n. 1) a crime sufficiently serious to be punishable by death or a term in state or federal prison, as distinguished from a misdemeanor which is only punishable by confinement to county or local jail and/or a fine. 2) a crime carrying a minimum term of one year or more in state prison, since a year or less can be served in county jail. However, a sentence upon conviction for a felony may sometimes be less than one year at the discretion of the judge and within limits set by statute. Felonies are sometimes referred to as "high crimes" as described in the U. S. Constitution. (See: sentence, misdemeanor)

felony

noun capital crime, crime graver than a missemeanor, criminal activity, criminal offense, gross offense, heinous crime, heinous misconduct, illegality, indictable offense, misdeed punishable by imprisonment, offense, offense punishable by imprisonment, transgression, violation of law, wrongdoing
Associated concepts: assault with intent to commit felony, capital felony, common law felony, compounding a felony, felonious intent, felony conviction, felony murder, substantive felony
Foreign phrases: Felonia, ex vi termini significat quodlibet capitale crimen felleo animo perpetratum.Felony by forceof the term, signifies any capital crime perpetrated with a criminal mind. Felonia implicatur in qualibet proditione. Felony is implied in every treason.
See also: burglary, crime, delict, homicide, housebreaking, misdeed

felony

a now archaic term of English law for crimes that by statute or by common law carried the death sentence and forfeiture on conviction. See MISDEMEANOUR. In some US states this still denotes more serious imprisonable crimes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, Cervone said, "We think it's important that the Legislature, through this council, look at reversing the trend of reclassifying offenses of misdemeanors to felonies.
189) Facing elevated stakes, criminals hopefully will carry out their felonies more carefully and control the conduct of their co-felons.
24) His criminal record arguably fit within the statutory definition of drug trafficking because his two subsequent state convictions for simple possession were concurrently "punishable" as felonies under the federal Controlled Substances Act, (25) and the First Circuit relied on this fact in reaching its primary holding.
Arrested at a California Youth Authority group home where he was staying as a condition of his release from CYA detention, Devine Holmes has been charged with eight felonies that carry a potential life term in prison if he is convicted.
There is a considerable historical literature that explores changes in the process of prosecuting both felonies and misdemeanors in England.
11, private security firms are increasingly conducting criminal background checks that are affecting mostly black and Latino workers with felonies, according to a National Public Radio report.
The bill would create two new anti-shredding felonies designed to set clear requirements for preserving financial audit documents and close loopholes in current laws.
On March 19th, the Volusia County Sheriff's Office charged Bennett with felony murder, a second-degree offense under a state law that allows persons involved in felonies to be charged with murder even when they do not personally do the killing.
The United States Supreme Court held that the BOP had the discretion, under the governing federal statute, to promulgate a regulation that categorically denies early release to prisoners whose felonies involved the use of a firearm.
The state of Alabama permanently bars people convicted of felonies from exercising the right to vote.
Fisher's previous two felonies were thefts of $100 from a pizza parlor, and $390 from his grandfather.