few


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few

adjective a few, a handful of, a small number of, a sprinkling of, excess of two, few and far between, hardly any, inconsequential, inconsiderable, infrequent, least, less, little, littlest, low, lowest, meager, minimal, minimum, more than two, negligible, not many, not too many, occasional, of small number, petty, picayune, preeious few, rare, scant, scarce, scarcely any, seldom, several, small, smallest, some, sparse, straggling, too few, trifling, unimportant
See also: deficient, infrequent, scarce, several
References in periodicals archive ?
Trusted Few is the manifestation of both, bringing together demanding homeowners and qualified business owners in an efficient and manageable format.
So far, Few has resisted the urge to leave Spokane, where he's built a really nice program, "found a very unique niche that has worked out great.
But when the NewSpacers lowered their sights from "infinity and beyond" to a few minutes of floating, they realized NASA couldn't really stop them from snagging a little bit of space all their own.
In Smith's eruption model, these stars would expel some material a few thousand years before they die as supernovas rather than stockpiling all of it until the bitter end.
If even for a few minutes a week you sit with your feet in a river, or go for a twenty-minute bike ride along the Blue Ridge Parkway, you will come away feeling rejuvenated.
Although the potential dollar savings for connecting the physician practice and care managers may be substantial, given the few physicians who currently have EMR systems and the few patients a disease management program may have in any one physician practice, it is impractical for multiple carriers to build independent data exchange systems with each physician.
This gave some members pause; a few awkward glances were exchanged.
A couple of plastic water bottles can act as dumbbells for a few bicep curls.
Because, however, the lives of saints are so important for Catholics, a Jesuit priest, Jean Bolland (1596-1665), of Antwerp, Belgium, with a few co-workers, began a critical study and publication of lives of the saints.
While some training programs have led to increased knowledge among staff, few have been shown to produce sustained improvements in nursing behavior.
The few reporters who had returned from the scrums to hear his words found ourselves looking at our shoes for a moment.
What's most tragic, though, is that despite recent polls and preachments, so few in the LGBT community see the juggernaut coming.