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Fiction

An assumption made by a court and embodied in various legal doctrines that a fact or concept is true when in actuality it is not true, or when it is likely to be equally false and true.

A legal fiction is created for the purpose of promoting the ends of justice. A common-law action, for example, allowed a father to bring suit against his daughter's seducer, based on the legal fiction of the loss of her services. Similarly, the law of torts encompasses the legal fiction of the rule of Vicarious Liability, which renders an employer responsible for the civil wrongs of his or her employees that are committed during their course of employment. Even though the employer generally is uninvolved in the actual act constituting the tort, the law holds the employer responsible since, through a legal fiction, he or she is deemed to be in direct control of the employee's actions. A seller of real estate might, for example, be liable in an action for Fraud committed by his or her agent in the course of a sale.

fiction

noun canard, concoction, fable, fabrication, fabula, false statement, falsehood, falsification, fancy, fantasy, feigned story, figment, invention, legend, lie, myth, perjury, prevarication, product of imagination, res ficta, untruth, untruthful report
Foreign phrases: Fictio legis inique operatur alieni damnum vel injuriam.Fiction of law is wrongful if it works loss or harm to anyone. Fictio juris non est ubi veritas. A fiction of law will not exist where the fact appears. Les fictions naissent de la loi, et non la loi des fictions. Fictions arise from the law, and not law from fictions. Fictio cedit veritati. Fictio juris non est ubi veritas. Fiction yields to truth. Where truth is, fiction of law does not exist.
See also: canard, falsehood, figment, lie, misstatement, myth, phantom, story, subterfuge

fiction

see LEGAL FICTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
It would be convenient to posit separate scenery for these two scenes, but a production that subsumes fictionally separate interior locations under a single house heading is unlikely to call for contrasting street scenes.
He is also (and here I switch tenses out of respect for the novel form, because now he's being fictionally portrayed by Roth as a might-have-been president) a fear-monger and an invoker of "national security.
Russian novelists such as Leo Tolstoy and Fyodor Dostoyevsky and African writers such as Chinua Achebe and Wole Soyinka have been "much more willing to write fictionally about ideas," Powers says, adding that societies in which war and material impoverishment have exacted a greater toll tend to produce writers who emphasize such issues in their fiction.
6 trillion by compiling real and fictionally projected budgetary appropriations that include lifetime healthcare costs, interest payments on debt, imagined costs of an eventual demobilization, economic opportunity costs of civilian wages lost to people enlisting in the military, depreciation of military equipment, the imputed value of lost human lives (assessed at $6 million per human being), the price of oil, the "macroeconomic effects" of the price of oil, and so forth.
He's mentioned fictionally on page 721, and I understand he was flattered at being included.
Percy saw this Cartesian spirit manifested most prominently in the pagan stoic code of honor that shaped Southern aristocratic society, represented fictionally by Faulkner's Compson family, and more personally by Percy's own ancestral family.
This theoretical clarity, which defines a national unconscious as constructed of historical contradictions fictionally (or dramatically) resolved, leads Wall to a cumulative argument attentive to the ways domestic goods and practices in England shaped the intricacies of sexuality, gender, and class in English identity formation.
On AIDS, he was fictionally quoted as saying "They that live in sin shall die in sin," something wholly typical of a period when a lot of people were saying that disease was the wages of sin.
Must Sui Sin Far destroy the improper love object she has fictionally and textually created?
In Walton's terminology, a sentence, proposition, or utterance is fictional or fictionally true (true in the game of make-believe) when the conventions pertaining to props of the relevant kind require participants in the game to imagine its being true.
An entire collection that charts the course of a single U-boat patrol is a rare find indeed, the only comparable examples are the photographs of war correspondent Lother-Gunther Buchheim, taken aboard U-96, a journey later immortalised fictionally in book and film as Das Boot.
Meanwhile, fictionally, North is intermittently at work upon a novel he titles Loss, which details the collapse of a marriage.