filthy


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
References in classic literature ?
Large and small, not less than a thousand of these filthy creatures lay in the hollow before us.
The Swede, after explaining in his gruff way that the huts were doubtless filthy and vermin-ridden, spread Jane's blankets on the ground for her, and at a little distance unrolled his own and lay down to sleep.
Right you are," said De Montfort, "but I could have sworn 'twas a child's feeble wail had I not seen the two filthy rodents with mine own eyes.
The place is filthy, the surroundings are repulsive, not to add degrading.
Me talk," spoke up a fat and filthy savage whose hairy chest was caked with the unwashed dirt of years.
It has fifty millions of inhabitants, and as the colour of the Filthy Pool does not wash off, they all look exactly alike.
How often (for example) have I thundered with all my heart and soul against the wicked extravagance of dress among women--against their filthy false hair and their nauseous powders and paints
Obedient to this summons there ranged themselves in front of the schoolmaster's desk, half-a-dozen scarecrows, out at knees and elbows, one of whom placed a torn and filthy book beneath his learned eye.
On the miserable bed lay a gray-headed old man of gigantic stature, with nothing on him but a ragged shirt and a pair of patched, filthy trousers.
Not when the truth is filthy, but when it is shallow, doth the discerning one go unwillingly into its waters.
The hotel of the provincial town where Nikolay Levin was lying ill was one of those provincial hotels which are constructed on the newest model of modern improvements, with the best intentions of cleanliness, comfort, and even elegance, but owing to the public that patronizes them, are with astounding rapidity transformed into filthy taverns with a pretension of modern improvement that only makes them worse than the old-fashioned, honestly filthy hotels.
There was a short, narrow, gloomy lane or street, shut in between lofty dwelling houses, the lane often dark, always filthy, without sidewalks, a gutter running through the centre, over which, suspended from a rope, hung a dim oil lamp or two--such was the Rue St.