flamboyant

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flamboyant

adjective affected, baroque, brave, braw, bright, colorful, dazzling, elaborate, extravagant, fancy, flashy, flowery, frilled, frilly, fussy, garish, gaudy, glitzy, grandiose, high-flown, high-flying, lofty, ornate, orotund, overdone, pompous, pretentious, sensational, sensationalistic, showy
See also: elaborate, grandiose, pretentious
References in periodicals archive ?
I'd like to think the current owner inherited her so he's prepared to put up with all her little quirks and her flamboyancy, and rather theatrical approach to the job," she adds.
Star Quality, Theatre Royal, Newcastle, until Saturday HAVING never seen a Nol Coward play performed before, I went along expecting two Coward trademarks: flamboyancy and wit.
It would be ideal if this progress could be announced with the flamboyancy of a John Williams score in Star Wars: Return of the Jedi, but in reality this reversal is subtle, bureaucratic, and over a decade old.
It also features Mika s trademark falsetto vocal acrobatics, which characterized "Life In Cartoon Motion" in moments of colorful flamboyancy, occasionally bordering on pomposity.
It was about colour, flamboyancy, friendliness and I think that came out on the television screens.
Flamboyancy mixed with a carefree attitude was represented in her collection of panelled ankle-length dresses.
For example, in monumental the Key is VCC, in thesaurus VVC, and in flamboyancy VV.
The singer admittedly was a man for Marmite tastes - you either embraced his flamboyancy and suspicious American twang or you didn't .
We want to see that panache and flamboyancy when you first came on the scene.
What stood outwas that Unitedwon the title, and deserved to, because they had a flamboyancy about their play, whereas the Reds weremore cautious.
The apparent apathy has been fuelled by the dividing lines between parties becoming less tangible and the lack of traditional flamboyancy among the candidates, she said.
Rushdie's fiction is that of resolve: writing and living despite the destructive power of history; Naipaul's fiction is that of resigned bitterness: whatever the dreams of triumph, reality will always ridicule their flamboyancy and reveal their pretentiousness.