flight

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flight

n. running away or hiding by a person officially accused of a crime with the apparent intent of avoiding arrest or prosecution.

flight

noun absconding, avoidance, decampment, departing, departure, desertion, disappearance, effugium, elusion, evacuation, evasion, exodus, fleeing, fuga, hasty departure, hegira, leaving, removal, retreat, running away
Associated concepts: flight from justice, fugitive from justice, unlawful flight to avoid prosecution
See also: abandonment, desertion, evasion
References in classic literature ?
At an altitude of five hundred feet, the pigeon drove on over the town of Berkeley and lifted its flight to the Contra Costa hills.
He reefed hastily to the uttermost, and at the same time depressed the angle of his flight to meet that upward surge.
An adept at winged blackmail, he had no aptitude for wings himself, and when he gazed down at the flying land and water far beneath him, he did not feel moved to attack his captor, now defenseless, both hands occupied with flight.
I pray you to draw a flight shaft with all your strength down the valley, that we may see the length of your shoot.
A shout burst from his comrades as they watched the swift and lofty flight of the heavy bolt.
Yet in North America there are woodpeckers which feed largely on fruit, and others with elongated wings which chase insects on the wing; and on the plains of La Plata, where not a tree grows, there is a woodpecker, which in every essential part of its organisation, even in its colouring, in the harsh tone of its voice, and undulatory flight, told me plainly of its close blood-relationship to our common species; yet it is a woodpecker which never climbs a tree!
Petrels are the most aerial and oceanic of birds, yet in the quiet Sounds of Tierra del Fuego, the Puffinuria berardi, in its general habits, in its astonishing power of diving, its manner of swimming, and of flying when unwillingly it takes flight, would be mistaken by any one for an auk or grebe; nevertheless, it is essentially a petrel, but with many parts of its organisation profoundly modified.
The silent common, the impulse of my flight, the starting flames, were as if they had been in a dream.
I often meditate upon this scene--the two of us, half-grown cubs, in the childhood of the race, and the one mastering his fear, beating down his selfish impulse of flight, in order to stand by and succor the other.
The front of this living column was distinctly marked by a line but very slightly indented, so regular and even was the flight.
The air was filled with their irregular flight, layer rising above layer, far above the tops of the highest pines, none daring to advance beyond the dangerous pass; when, suddenly, some of the headers of the feathered tribes shot across the valley, taking their flight directly over the village, and hundreds of thousands in their rear followed the example, deserting the eastern side of the plain to their persecutors and the slain.
as the darkness into which passed the mosquito that knew the secret of flying, and that, despite its perfectness of flight, with almost an unthought action, he squashed with the flat of his hand against the back of his neck when it bit him?