forebears


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References in classic literature ?
From some great throne within, your forebears may have directed the destinies of half the world.
She remembered back to her mother's tales, and to the wood engraving in her scrapbook where her half-clad forebears, sword in hand, leaped from their lean beaked boats to do battle on the blood-drenched sands of England.
Presently the willows parted on the other bank, and Robin could hardly forebear laughing out right.
It was in the dusk of Death's fluttery wings that Tarwater thus crouched, and, like his remote forebear, the child-man, went to myth-making, and sun-heroizing, himself hero-maker and the hero in quest of the immemorable treasure difficult of attainment.
If the exercise is to determine where our forebears came from, that is surely fairly locationspecific and cannot be generalised on a national scale.
Forebears, originally published in Australia in 2009, is a companion volume to Cousins Across the Seas.
Dear Editor, Our Victorian forebears certainly knew something, not least about human nature, as instances the work of the Christian social reformers of that age.
All my forebears (even if not the eldest son) could and did get married.
Hardly anyone could claim that they or their forebears were not immigrants.
Whilst warning that he did not believe there were any "quick solutions", Williams insists that the church must acknowledge the "terrible things that our forebears did" and "work at" the issue of reparations.
Instead, comedian Alan Davies stages a Masonic dinner and actor Ken Stott tries tailoring like their forebears.
In order for us to be caught up in this world in such a way that it can reshape our own, we must work harder than our ancient forebears to discern its assumptions.