foreseeable risk

foreseeable risk

n. a danger which a reasonable person should anticipate as the result from his/her actions. Foreseeable risk is a common affirmative defense put up as a response by defendants in lawsuits for negligence. A skier hits a bump on a ski run, falls and breaks his leg. This is a foreseeable risk of skiing. A mother is severely injured while accompanying her child on a roller coaster when the car jumps the track and comes loose. While there is potential risk, she had the right to anticipate that the roller coaster was properly maintained and did not assume the risk that it would come apart. Signs that warn "use at your own risk" do not bar lawsuits for risks that are not foreseeable. (See: foreseeability)

References in periodicals archive ?
3 on suspension of play due to light, weather and adverse conditions of ground now says: "If at any time the umpires together agree that the conditions of ground, weather or light are so bad that there is obvious and foreseeable risk to the safety of any player or umpire, so that it would be unreasonable or dangerous for play to take place, then they shall immediately suspend play, or not allow play to commence or to restart.
Sleep apnea, by virtue of its sleep disturbances and resulting daytime sleepiness, poses a foreseeable risk of harm.
The goal of a warning is to inform the user of the nature and gravity of a foreseeable risk and how to avoid it.
Blackstock claims that 6ft 4in Olofinjana, who these days plays for Sheffield Wednesday, was "negligent" in "failing to play the ball" and "challenging (him) in a way that caused a reasonably foreseeable risk of injury" in the 88th minute of the game.
One example of a substantial difference between the editions was described in a recent federal court opinion: Restatement Third requires the trier of fact to consider traditional negligence concepts such as foreseeable risk and reasonable care, making the inquiry focus on the conduct of the manufacturer; in contrast, Restatement Second applied a strict liability standard.
Blackstock claims that the 6ft 4ins midfielder, who now plays for Sheffield Wednesday, was "negligent" in "failing to play the ball" and "challenging (him) in a way that caused a reasonably foreseeable risk of injury" in the 88th minute of the game.
Blackstock claims that 6'4" Olofinjana, who these days plays for Sheffield Wednesday, was "negligent" in "failing to play the ball" and "challenging (him) in a way that caused a reasonably foreseeable risk of injury" in the 88th minute of the game.
Judge Mr Justice Bean said it was "unrealistic" to say allowing the use of a paddling pool "created a foreseeable risk of significant injury".
Neil Henderson, head of Aon Risk Solutions' Crisis Management Terrorism team, said, "Terrorism is having an increasing impact on today's global organizations and terrorist attacks are now regarded as a foreseeable risk.
WPC Taylor's lawyer Andrew Roy, urged the court to uphold the 2008 verdict because the flat-turned-drug factory in Southsea, Hants, was "dangerous premises" with a foreseeable risk of injury.
In a landmark opinion reinstating the suit, the Court of Appeals agreed that, while a hotel is legally allowed to evict a guest, it must use reasonable care in doing so when there is a foreseeable risk that the guest will suffer harm as a result of the eviction.
That glorious clause, in the section under 'playing conditions' states that "if at any time the umpires together agree that the conditions of ground, weather or light are so bad that there is obvious and foreseeable risk to the safety of any player or umpire, then they shall immediately suspend play.