forfeit

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Related to forfeitures: forfeited

Forfeit

To lose to another person or to the state some privilege, right, or property due to the commission of an error, an offense, or a crime, a breach of contract, or a neglect of duty; to subject property to confiscation; or to become liable for the payment of a penalty, as the result of a particular act. To lose a franchise, estate, or other property, as provided by the applicable law, due to Negligence, misfeasance, or omission.

This nonconsensual deprivation transfers the property to another person or restores it to the original grantor.

forfeit

v. to lose property or rights involuntary as a penalty for violation of law. Example: the government can take automobiles or houses which are used for illegal drug trafficking or manufacture. A drug pusher may forfeit his/her car (property) if caught carrying drugs in it and found guilty. A parent may have to forfeit his/her house if his/her daughter is selling drugs from the house, even though the parent had nothing to do with and no knowledge of the drugs. One may have to forfeit one's driver's license or lose driving privileges due to multiple traffic violations or drunk driving. (See: forfeiture)

forfeit

verb abandon, abdicate, abjure, alienate by breach of condition, be deprived of, capitulate, cede, default, deliver up, demit, disgorge, escheat, fail to keep, fail to retain, forgo, forswear, give away, give up, give up claim to, give up the argument, give up the point, incur a loss, let go, let slip, lose, lose an opportunity, lose by breach of condition, lose by default, lose by failure to appear, meet with a loss, part with, put aside, quit, re multari, relinquish, rem amittere, renounce, repudiate, sacrifice, surrender, waive, withdraw, yield
Associated concepts: forfeit a bond, forfeit a deposit, forfeit bail
See also: abandon, amercement, confiscate, deposit, detriment, discontinue, disfranchise, disinherit, divest, effect, expense, fine, lose, loss, penalize, penalty, sacrifice, surrender, toll
References in periodicals archive ?
HB 303 also shifts the burden of proving guilt to the government, and increases the burden of proof to mirror that of the federal government in forfeiture cases from probable cause to a preponderance of the evidence, a fair and equitable standard.
Funds received through the Asset Forfeiture Program support the costs of law enforcement overtime and wire intercepts for major investigations, training, intelligence centers, prevention programs and investigative equipment.
Neily and Lemisch each spoke on several facets of civil forfeiture, with Neily advocating for changes in the practice, while Lemisch promoted many reasons why law enforcement agencies utilize it.
A representative of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, Jarrett Skorup, also provided insight on civil forfeiture in Michigan after the event.
No forfeitures in a suspense account should remain unallocated beyond the end of the plan year in which they occurred.
For those plans that use forfeitures to reduce plan expenses or employer contributions, there should be plan language and administrative procedures to ensure that forfeitures will be used up promptly in the year in which they occurred or, in appropriate situations, no later than the immediately succeeding plan year.
that their forfeitures could be enforced qui tam, through actions
enforce statutory forfeitures, an action upon an information in rem was
pecuniary interest in cash civil forfeitures increases incentives to
This trend has become so popular that forfeiture specialists travel the country conducting seminars teaching local police and federal law enforcement agents how to use forfeiture cases as revenue generators.
Unlike criminal forfeiture, in which the loss of property is contingent on the owner's conviction of a crime, in civil forfeiture it is the property itself that is "accused" of involvement in criminal activity, and it is up to the owner to prove the taking was wrong.
Civil forfeiture is a truly extraordinary legal doctrine--so much