foster child


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Related to foster child: Foster mother, Foster youth

foster child

n. a child without parental support and protection, placed with a person or family to be cared for, usually by local welfare services or by court order. The foster parent(s) do not have custody, nor is there an adoption, but they are expected to treat the foster child as they would their own in regard to food, housing, clothing and education. Most foster parents are paid by the local government or a state agency.

See: child

foster child

see FOSTER PARENTS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Establishing a positive, caring classroom environment which supports the needs of the foster child is imperative to academic success.
One foster child described in the report was prescribed 11 medications in one month, including two antidepressants and two stimulants to treat ADHD, at a cost of $1,088 to the state's Medicaid program.
Otherwise, the foster child cannot be claimed as a dependent.
Children who foster often have to compete with a foster child for their parents' attention.
A third foster child in Crozier's care - a five-year-old girl - said Crozier assaulted her in 2002.
For example, if the foster parents do a very good job, the foster child may be a candidate for adoption and may risk losing progress in a family less prepared than the foster family.
This partnership can go a long way toward helping a foster child cope with unsettled family and school situations.
Well, our second foster child, who, by the time you read this, will have been legally adopted by us on February 14--his third birthday.
Every teenager has to live by rules, and [a] foster child shouldn't be any different.
Heather, a seventh-grader at Ernest Becker Middle School, has written a series of 10 booklets to help foster children understand and cope with their situations, based on her own experiences as a foster child.
While the board is seeking replacement options, the county is left without any entity to probe foster child deaths or other problems at DCFS.
In some cases, the IRS might, on one part of a tax return, view a child of a nonlegal parent as a foster child or dependent, but might not on another.