fosterage


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In Emma, Jane's fosterage by the Dixons and Frank's adoption by his late mother's family also suggest the spectrum of arrangements that comprised de facto adoption (as well as Austen's persistent interest in the topic).
The 'ill-defined' (29) concept of fosterage, as employed by Pearse, is best understood metaphorically.
The last two lines of 'Fosterage' witness the word 'fostered' for the first time--as if the idea of fosterage only really became clear somewhere between B3 and the final poem--and also that image, rooted in the Classical world, of 'words | Imposing on my tongue like obols'.
4) Their presence in non-natal households reflects the ubiquity of fosterage, adoption, apprenticeship, and child domestic labor--diverse but overlapping practices I refer to collectively as child circulation.
A fosterage tradition remains strong among Cape Verdeans.
Mauclaire, Simone, 1993, << L'institution de l'heritier et la pratique de nourrir le gendre dans le Japon ancien >>, colloque Adoption et Fosterage, Paris, 4 et 5 juin.