freight


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Freight

The price or compensation paid for the transportation of goods by a carrier. Freight is also applied to the goods transported by such carriers.

The liability of a carrier for freight damaged, lost, or destroyed during shipment is determined by contract, statute, or Tort Law.

The responsibility for the payment of freight is a subject of a term of a sales contract between the buyer and seller of the goods to be shipped. When a contract contains a c.f. & i. provision, the buyer accepts liability for paying the cost of freight in addition to the costs of the goods and insurance on them.

freight

noun article of commerce, cargo, carload, consignment, freightage, goods, lading, load, onus, pay load, shipment
See also: cargo, load, merchandise, send

freight

the amount payable by a charterer or shipper to a shipowner for the letting of the ship or space therein for the carriage of goods by sea. Advance freight is payable to a shipowner on the signing of a bill of lading or on shipment instead of on delivery of the goods; such freight is not normally returnable in the event of the ship or the goods being lost before the start of the voyage.
References in classic literature ?
One never saw the fields, nor any green thing whatever, in Packingtown; but one could go out on the road and "hobo it," as the men phrased it, and see the country, and have a long rest, and an easy time riding on the freight cars.
Rebecca, Adam thought, as he took off his hat and saluted the pretty panorama,--Rebecca, with her tall slenderness, her thoughtful brow, the fire of young joy in her face, her fillet of dark braided hair, might have been a young Muse or Sibyl; and the flowery hayrack, with its freight of blooming girlhood, might have been painted as an allegorical picture of The Morning of Life.
When the first pair of wires was strung between New York and Chicago, for instance, it was found to weigh 870,000 pounds--a full load for a twenty-two-car freight train; and the cost of the bare metal was $130,000.
But few buildings in Zodanga were higher than these barracks, though several topped it by a few hundred feet; the docks of the great battleships of the line standing some fifteen hundred feet from the ground, while the freight and passenger stations of the merchant squadrons rose nearly as high.
Between these two considerations, at least, he was more than usually moved; and when he got to Randolph Crescent, he quite forgot the four hundred pounds in the inner pocket of his greatcoat, hung up the coat, with its rich freight, upon his particular pin of the hatstand; and in the very action sealed his doom.
As I write there is in the passage below a sound of many tramping feet and the crash of weights being set down heavily, doubtless the boxes, with their freight of earth.
Your son has probably neglected some prescribed form or attention in registering his cargo, and it is more than probable he will be set at liberty directly he has given the information required, whether touching the health of his crew, or the value of his freight.
The doctor had thumbed over all his books of knowledge for the occasion, and the black fisherman was engaged to take them in his skiff to the scene of enterprise, to work with spade and pickax in unearthing the treasure, and to freight his bark with the weighty spoils they were certain of finding.
Here is a traveler who wishes to freight your bark, and will pay you well; serve him well.
Of the different sorts of the first are husbandmen, artificers, exchange-men, who are employed in buying and selling, seamen, of which some are engaged in war, some in traffic, some in carrying goods and passengers from place to place, others in fishing, and of each of these there are often many, as fishermen at Tarentum and Byzantium, masters of galleys at Athens, merchants at AEgina and Chios, those who let ships on freight at Tenedos; we may add to these those who live by their manual labour and have but little property; so that they cannot live without some employ: and also those who are not free-born on both sides, and whatever other sort of common people there may be.
He came out on deck and, peering over the side, descried the lone canoe floating a short distance astern with its grim and grisly freight.
Grimly the war prahu with its frightful freight nosed closer to the bank.

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