freight

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Freight

The price or compensation paid for the transportation of goods by a carrier. Freight is also applied to the goods transported by such carriers.

The liability of a carrier for freight damaged, lost, or destroyed during shipment is determined by contract, statute, or Tort Law.

The responsibility for the payment of freight is a subject of a term of a sales contract between the buyer and seller of the goods to be shipped. When a contract contains a c.f. & i. provision, the buyer accepts liability for paying the cost of freight in addition to the costs of the goods and insurance on them.

freight

noun article of commerce, cargo, carload, consignment, freightage, goods, lading, load, onus, pay load, shipment
See also: cargo, load, merchandise, send

freight

the amount payable by a charterer or shipper to a shipowner for the letting of the ship or space therein for the carriage of goods by sea. Advance freight is payable to a shipowner on the signing of a bill of lading or on shipment instead of on delivery of the goods; such freight is not normally returnable in the event of the ship or the goods being lost before the start of the voyage.
References in classic literature ?
But freights was up, an' they hod a charter o' coals for Portland.
Hermann had been trading in the East for three years or more, carry ing freights of rice and timber mostly.
There is some advantage in this; because these twin-tubs being so small they fit more readily into the boat, and do not strain it so much; whereas, the American tub, nearly three feet in diameter and of proportionate depth, makes a rather bulky freight for a craft whose planks are but one half-inch in thickness; for the bottom of the whale-boat is like critical ice, which will bear up a considerable distributed weight, but not very much of a concentrated one.
Here and there would be a bridge crossing a filthy creek, with hard-baked mud shores and dingy sheds and docks along it; here and there would be a railroad crossing, with a tangle of switches, and locomotives puffing, and rattling freight cars filing by; here and there would be a great factory, a dingy building with innumerable windows in it, and immense volumes of smoke pouring from the chimneys, darkening the air above and making filthy the earth beneath.
Very well; if you tell a German to send your trunk to you by "slow freight," he takes you at your word; he sends it by "slow freight," and you cannot imagine how long you will go on enlarging your admiration of the expressiveness of that phrase in the German tongue, before you get that trunk.
Between these two considerations, at least, he was more than usually moved; and when he got to Randolph Crescent, he quite forgot the four hundred pounds in the inner pocket of his greatcoat, hung up the coat, with its rich freight, upon his particular pin of the hatstand; and in the very action sealed his doom.
Your son has probably neglected some prescribed form or attention in registering his cargo, and it is more than probable he will be set at liberty directly he has given the information required, whether touching the health of his crew, or the value of his freight.
Here is a traveler who wishes to freight your bark, and will pay you well; serve him well.
Of the different sorts of the first are husbandmen, artificers, exchange-men, who are employed in buying and selling, seamen, of which some are engaged in war, some in traffic, some in carrying goods and passengers from place to place, others in fishing, and of each of these there are often many, as fishermen at Tarentum and Byzantium, masters of galleys at Athens, merchants at AEgina and Chios, those who let ships on freight at Tenedos; we may add to these those who live by their manual labour and have but little property; so that they cannot live without some employ: and also those who are not free-born on both sides, and whatever other sort of common people there may be.