frivolous

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Frivolous

Of minimal importance; legally worthless.

A frivolous suit is one without any legal merit. In some cases, such an action might be brought in bad faith for the purpose of harrassing the defendant. In such a case, the individual bringing the frivolous suit might be liable for damages for Malicious Prosecution.

A frivolous appeal is one that is completely lacking merit, since no review able question has been raised therein.

frivolous

adj. referring to a legal move in a lawsuit clearly intended merely to harass, delay, or embarrass the opposition. Frivolous acts can include filing the lawsuit itself, a baseless motion for a legal ruling, an answer of a defendant to a complaint which does not deny, contest, prove, or controvert anything, or an appeal which contains not a single arguable basis (by any stretch of the imagination) for the appeal. A frivolous lawsuit, motion or appeal can result in a successful claim by the other party for payment by the frivolous suer of their attorneys fees for defending the case. Judges are reluctant to find an action frivolous, based on the desire not to discourage people from using the courts to resolve disputes.

frivolous

adjective childish, flighty, flimsy, flippant, giddy, immaterial, inanis, insignificant, levis, light, meaningless, minor, nugax, of little weight, of no account, paltry, petty, senseless, shallow, silly, slight, trifling, trivial, unimportant, unserious, unworthy of serious notice, worthless
Associated concepts: frivolous answer, frivolous appeal, frivvlous cause of action, frivolous claims, frivolous pleading
See also: capricious, inconsequential, irresolute, irresponsible, jocular, nonessential, nugatory, petty, superficial, trivial, undependable, untrustworthy
References in classic literature ?
In his romantic comedies and comedies of manners Shirley vividly reflects the thoughtless life of the Court of Charles I and of the well-to-do contemporary London citizens and shows how surprisingly far that life had progressed toward the reckless frivolity and abandonment which after the interval of Puritan rule were to run riot in the Restoration period.
So many women are capricious, breaking into odd flaws of passion or frivolity.
The frivolity of the laughter-loving Latins is no part of him.
She felt the frivolity of pleasure and longed for more substantial benefits.
The conception of riding on horseback for a lady was, in Darya Alexandrovna's mind, associated with ideas of youthful flirtation and frivolity, which, in her opinion, was unbecoming in Anna's position.
His vo cal arrangements blared after me a few threats of coming down on the ship for the demurrage of the lighters, and all the other expenses consequent upon the delays arising from my frivolity.
Considering the air of gravity extending even to the physiognomy of the coachman and the action of the showy horses, this quaint display might have possessed a mystic significance, but to the corrupt frivolity of a Western mind, like my own, it seemed hardly decent.
The ladies who had commodities of their own to sell, and did not want dressing-gowns, saw at once the frivolity and bad taste of this masculine preference for goods which any tailor could furnish; and it is possible that the emphatic notice of various kinds which was drawn toward Miss Tulliver on this public occasion, threw a very strong and unmistakable light on her subsequent conduct in many minds then present.
for political and social historians such apparent frivolity is out of keeping with the struggle of the lower orders to emancipate themselves.
They're planning to spend spring break with their friends, but in between all the fun and frivolity, they also have to prepare for a daunting prospect - their first job interview.
It may sound like a bit of Bank Holiday frivolity to fill a newspaper page, but the longterm implications are very unsettling.
ALTHOUGH very well written, Thomas Wilkinson's letter Cut Out Frivolity (10.