fructify

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fructify

verb ameliorate, bear, bear fruit, beget, blossom, bring forth, conceive, cultivate, enrich, fatten, fertilize, flourish, generate, impregnate, irrigate, make fruitful, make productive, pollinate, procreate, produce, proliferate, propagate, reproduce, spermatize, thrive
See also: ameliorate, bear, reproduce, yield
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References in periodicals archive ?
Instead of money going u pin smoke, it could be fructifying in your pension fund or lopping years off your mortgage.
Instead of money going up in smoke it could be fructifying in your pension fund or lopping years off your mortgage.
Sampling the 'post-1960 period, Murray stresses that "the matter of Ireland" still informs the plays, and tradition holds them "in a loving, fructifying embrace" (402).
Martin shakes his head over the continuing confinement of Islamic studies to Middle Eastern, or to a lesser extent, South Asian area studies programs, undermining the possibilities of "a direct and fructifying relationship between the activities of Islamicists and those of historians of religions" (p.
Just as the Holy Spirit breathed Life into life on the sixth day of creation, the church of Jesus Christ received, on Pentecost, its vocation -- as yeast, the fructifying agent of the Bread of Life for our fragile world.
The positions of Maimonides the philosopher and Rambam the rabbi form a seamless whole, each fructifying and enriching the other.
As Matsuda puts it, language itself was a rich and fructifying "memory," which lived on not only in the spoken words but also in the speakers' bodies - the French people's voice organs, properly trained and disciplined.
In its heyday in the Forties and Fifties, Partisan Review was more than just a lively intellectual magazine: it was the cultural epicenter for a generation of writers and critics who helped preserve a rigorous standard of intellectual debate and openness to the fructifying currents of high modernism.
Edinburgh's golden age, like Dublin's, in painting, architecture, philosophy, literature, music and poetry, as well as theology, political economy, and applied science, was a direct outcome of the union; so were its prosperity and its fructifying new contacts and opportunities.