fuddle


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Young, H, Osman, A M, Aklilu, Y Dale, R, Badri, B and A J A Fuddle (2005), Darfur--Livelihoods under siege.
Leggatt demonstrates familiarity with Shakespeare criticism and with the reigning theories of early modern culture without allowing a clutter of jargon to fuddle his writing.
A recent issue of the newsletter--which chronicles the fictional Fuddle River School District--featured a list of approved esoteric educational jargon, including "assessmentalizing" and "whatsoeverables" and such banned terms as "learning" and "teaching.
Over the years, the following words and phrases have fallen into that category in Canada: parliamentary pugilist (1875); a bag of wind (1878); inspired by forty-rod whiskey (1881); coming into the world by accident (1886); blatherskite (1890); the political sewer pipe from Carleton County (1917); lacking in intelligence (1934); a dim-witted saboteur (1956); liar (consistently from 1959 to the present); a trained seal (1961); evil genius (1962); Canadian Mussolini (1964); pompous ass (1967); fuddle duddie (1971); pig (1977); jerk (1980); sleaze bag (1984); racist (1986); scuzzball (1988).
Likewise intoxicating liquors fuddle the head--they injure no one else.
Yes, it can sound like fuddle, muddle or having had two glasses too many of the Petrus.
The opened cover compared to the opened eye, to a chest of treasure, a doorway to the divine, the cork in a bottle; however, books bore error on through time as well as truth, opinion, hypothesis, and conjecture, and they could fuddle the mind as well as wine.
The critical preambles were combined with the following five verbs: (1) zich bedrinken 'to fuddle oneself,' (2) zich misdragen 'to misbehave,' (3) zich schamen 'to feel ashamed,' (4) zich vergissen 'to make a mistake,' and (5) zich verspreken 'to make a slip of the tongue.
This naivety prevents an understanding of how people can contemplate martyrdom, and Western multiculturalists fuddle about for rational, "secular" explanations for the phenomenon, offering simplistic platitudes, like "poverty causes terrorism".
Probably Mark Twain said it best: ``There is nothing in the world like a persuasive speech (or letter) to fuddle the mental apparatus (or the NRA).
The principals are outstanding, full of confidence and vitality, with Daniel Clarke, the wizard Fuddle, worthy of particular note.
At times, the profession must appear to outsiders to be a gigantic fuddle factory without a core.