fulmination

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After the fulminations over Cumbrian mass murderer Derrick Bird, the hand-wringing psychoanalysis brigade moved their attention to the wicked deeds of an ex-night club bouncer who had also flipped.
And what should I make of those sanctimonious fulminations of some of the usual suspects from amongst our celebrity analysts who also echoed the words of the chief minister?
lobby and the dreadful racism and fulminations of pro-Israeli
The book's target market is likely, however, to focus more on Crowley's opinions on day care (against) and parents' rights to administer corporal punishment (for)--and on his fulminations on the evils of "pseudo-work" (most of government, the East Coast inshore fishery and sociology professors).
After a period of fulminations and negotiations, the NBA and its referees did sign a contract.
It would appear that he has to go through Congress, which would mean endless fulminations, not only on the floor of the House and Senate but on the cable channels, stirring up all the extremists.
The commission observed: One would have ignored Musharrafs fulminations as being undeserving of a response but for the possibility of his plans to again assume leadership of the enemies of democracy and basic freedoms.
The commission observed: "One would have ignored Musharraf's fulminations as being undeserving of a response but for the possibility of his plans to again assume leadership of the enemies of democracy and basic freedoms".
Altogether, one can glean a truer sense of what makes Naipaul extraordinary from his early works of autobiographical fiction than from French's tiresome chronicling of the writer's comings and goings, alliances and betrayals, dinner dates, snits, funks and fulminations.
Although Schenker avoids Jewish issues and we may find his fulminations offensive, Cook points out that even those who understood him best "felt under no obligation to condone his political views, and no more need we" (p.
It was this contrast between reality and fiction that inspired Plato's fulminations against poetry in The Republic and David Hume's characterization of poets as "liars by profession" who "endeavor to give an air of truth to their fictions" in his Treatise of Human Nature (87).
Massad's conspiratorial fulminations against the "Gay International" may obscure this broader point for some readers.