gender

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gender

noun female, category, class, classification, delineation, kind, male, neuter, sex, sexuality, type
Associated concepts: gender law

GENDER. That which designates the sexes.
     2. As a general rule, when the masculine is used it includes the feminine, as, man (q. v.) sometimes includes women. This is the general rule, unless a contrary intention appears. But in penal statutes, which must be construed strictly, when the masculine is used and not the feminine, the latter is not in general included. 3 C. & P. 225. An instance to the contrary, however, may be found in the construction, 25 Ed. III, st. 5, c. 2, Sec. 1, which declares it to be high treason, "When a man doth compass or imagine the death of our lord the king," &c. These words, "our lord the king," have been construed to include a queen regnant. 2 Inst. 7, 8, 9; H. P. C. 12; 1 Hawk. P. C. c. 17; Bac. Ab. Treason, D.
     3. Pothier says that the masculine often includes the feminine, but the feminine never includes the masculine; that according to this rule if a man were to bequeath to another all his horses, his mares would pass by the legacy; but if he were to give all his mares, the horses would not be included. Poth. Introd. au titre 16, des Testaments et Donations Testamentaires, n. 170; 3 Brev. R. 9. In the Louisiana code in the French language, it is provided that the word fils, sons, comprehends filles, daughters. Art. 3522, n. 1. Vide Ayl. Pand. 57; 4 Car. & Payne, 216; S. C. 19 Engl. Com. Law R. 351; Barr. on the Stat. 216, note; Feme; Feme covert; Feminine; Male; Man; Sex; Women; Worthiest of blood.

References in periodicals archive ?
White writes about the vilification of Isabel II in the years leading up to the Revolution of 1868 and the powerful gendering of the monarchy, the Republic, and the populace by the press and pamphleteers.
Editors and authors linked food and gender norms in at least two ways: sexualizing the process of cooking - as in "a way to a man's heart is through his stomach" - and by gendering particular cooking processes or types of food, in particular linking masculine behavior to meat preparation and barbecuing.
When these authorities of the kitchen also sought authority over the meaning of women's roles by gendering certain foods or informing women of the inevitability of cooking duties, it was in fact a plea for authority.