genetic

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Related to gene: gene expression, gene therapy, DNA

genetic

adjective atavistic, congenital, hereditary, ingrained, inherited, innate
See also: born, hereditary, innate, native
References in periodicals archive ?
Gene expression profiles associated with inflammation, fibrosis, and cholestasis in mouse liver after Griseofulvin.
The researchers next tailored bits of dsRNA to match particular gene sequences.
In addition, a possible RNA editing signal similar to that found in the P gene of other paramyxoviruses is present (Figure 1A).
The primary product offered by Gene Express is its StaRT-PCR patented, platform technology, providing standardized, quantitative, measurement of nucleic acid copy number, enabling multi-gene measurement of transcript abundance, and/or genomic DNA copy number.
Many genetic disorders, like cancer and heart disease, are caused by a faulty or missing gene inherited from one or both parents.
It is not obviously a gene for intelligence, but according to Ridley, "it is perhaps relevant that another study has found that people with high IQs are more efficient at using glucose in their brains.
A journalist responding to the efforts to disseminate the Seville material expressed the prevailing attitude: "Call me when you find the gene for war.
1) ADA gene copy is inserted into a specially engineered virus.
Once one of these markers is identified as being consistently inherited by people with MS, the scientists will focus on that area, finding markers closer to the gene, and eventually identifying the absolute location of the gene itself.
When used as gene therapy, RNAi turns off genes that are overactive in such diseases as cancer or macular degeneration, or disables genes needed by an invading virus.
These polymorphisms are depicted by position in the gene in Figure 2 by vertical descending bars whose length is proportional to the allele frequency in the PDR.
Generally, the more closely related the species, the more similar their gene sequences.