general


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general

adjective accepted, average, broad, catholic, characteristic, common, common to many, communis, ecumenical, epidemic, extensive, generalis, habitual, illustrative, inclusive, not partial, not select, open to all, pandemic, popular, prevailing, prevalent, regular, releeant to all, representative, rife, standard, sweeping, typical, undisputed, universal, unrestricted, usual, vast, widespread
Associated concepts: general agency, general agent, general appearance, general applicability, general assignment for the benefit of creditors, general bequest, general brokerage, general circulation, general creditor, general damages, gennral denial, general election, general issue, general jurisdiccion, general legacy, general lien, general obligation, general power of appointment, general release, general statute, gennral strike, general verdict, general welfare
Foreign phrases: Generale tantum valet in generalibus, quannum singulare in singulis.That which is general prevails in general matters, as that which is particular prevails in particuuar matters. Generalibus specialia derogant. Special words derogate from the meaning of general ones. Generalis reggla generaliter est intelligenda. A general rule is to be unnerstood generally. Generalis clausula non porrigitur adea quaeantea specialiter sunt comprehensa. A general clause is not extended to include those things that havebeen previously provided for specially. Statutum generaliter est intelligendum quando verba statuti sunt specialia, ratio autem generalis. When the words of a statute are special, but the reason general, the statute is to be understood generally. Generalia praecedunt, specialia sequuntur. General matters precede, special matters follow. In generalibus versatur error. Error thrives in generalities. Fraus latet in generalibus. Fraud lies hidden in general expressions.
See also: broad, chief, collective, competitive, conventional, current, customary, familiar, generic, habitual, inaccurate, inclusive, inexact, liberal, mutual, national, nonsectarian, omnibus, open, ordinary, predominant, prevailing, prevalent, proverbial, public, regular, rife, routine, unspecified, usual, vague

AFFIRMANCE-DAY, GENERAL. In the English Court of Exchequer, is a day appointed by the judges of the common pleas, and barons of the exchequer, to be held a few days after the beginning of every term for the general affirmance or reversal of judgments. 2 Tidd. 1091.

DAMAGES, GENERAL, torts. General damages are such as the law implies to have accrued from the act of a tort-feasor. To call a man a thief, or commit an assault and battery upon his person, are examples of this kind. In the first case the law presumes that calling a man a thief must be injurious to him, with showing that it is so. Sir W. Jones, 196; 1 Saund. 243, b. n. 5; and in the latter case, the law implies that his person has been more or less deteriorated, and that the injured party is not required to specify what injury he has sustained, nor to prove it. Ham. N. P. 40; 1 Chit. Pl. 386; 2 L.R. 76; 4 Bouv. Inst. n. 3584.

GENERAL. This word has several meanings, namely: 1. A principal officer, particularly in the army. 2. Something opposed to special; as, a general verdict, the general issue, which expressions are used in contradistinction to special verdict, special issue. 3. Principal, as the general post office. 4. Not select, as a general ship. (q. v.) 5. Not particular, as a general custom. 6. Not limited, as general jurisdiction. 7. This word is sometimes annexed or prefixed to other words to express or limit the extent of their signification; as Attorney General, Solicitor General, the General Assembly, &c.

HEIR, GENERAL. Heir at common in the English law. The heir at common law is he who, after his father or ancestor's death has a right to, and is introduced into all his lands, tenements and hereditaments. He must be of the whole blood, not a bastard, alien, &c. Bac. Abr. Heir, B 2; Coparceners; Descent.

References in classic literature ?
The execution of this trust occupied Mrs General about seven years, in the course of which time she made the tour of Europe, and saw most of that extensive miscellany of objects which it is essential that all persons of polite cultivation should see with other people's eyes, and never with their own.
Then, monsieur," said one of them, "do you pretend not to know where the general is?
Well, Granet," the General inquired, "how are you getting on?
During all this time, the general, on whom they thought to have relied as on a brother, manifested evidently signs of discontent and repugnance.
And here it is to be noted that I do not deny absolutely there are general ideas, but only that there are any ABSTRACT general ideas; for, in the passages we have quoted wherein there is mention of general ideas, it is always supposed that they are formed by abstraction, after the manner set forth in sections 8 and 9.
But you know the wise maxim your excellency, advising one to expect the worst," said the Austrian general, evidently wishing to have done with jests and to come to business.
In the first place," said the General, "we cannot march across the deadly desert to the Land of Oz.
Something was certainly to be concealed; her fancy, though it had trespassed lately once or twice, could not mislead her here; and what that something was, a short sentence of Miss Tilney's, as they followed the general at some distance downstairs, seemed to point out: "I was going to take you into what was my mother's room -- the room in which she died -- " were all her words; but few as they were, they conveyed pages of intelligence to Catherine.
Interminably he discoursed on finance and Russian politics, and though, at times, the General made feints to contradict him, he did so humbly, and as though wishing not wholly to lose sight of his own dignity.
The prince's expression was so good-natured at this moment, and so entirely free from even a suspicion of unpleasant feeling was the smile with which he looked at the general as he spoke, that the latter suddenly paused, and appeared to gaze at his guest from quite a new point of view, all in an instant.
Followed by her Army the General now rushed to the gateway, where she was confronted by the Royal Army of Oz -- which was the other name for the Soldier with the Green Whiskers.
This brave French general ordered his drums to strike up, and immediately marched to encounter Wolfe.