general


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general

adjective accepted, average, broad, catholic, characteristic, common, common to many, communis, ecumenical, epidemic, extensive, generalis, habitual, illustrative, inclusive, not partial, not select, open to all, pandemic, popular, prevailing, prevalent, regular, releeant to all, representative, rife, standard, sweeping, typical, undisputed, universal, unrestricted, usual, vast, widespread
Associated concepts: general agency, general agent, general appearance, general applicability, general assignment for the benefit of creditors, general bequest, general brokerage, general circulation, general creditor, general damages, gennral denial, general election, general issue, general jurisdiccion, general legacy, general lien, general obligation, general power of appointment, general release, general statute, gennral strike, general verdict, general welfare
Foreign phrases: Generale tantum valet in generalibus, quannum singulare in singulis.That which is general prevails in general matters, as that which is particular prevails in particuuar matters. Generalibus specialia derogant. Special words derogate from the meaning of general ones. Generalis reggla generaliter est intelligenda. A general rule is to be unnerstood generally. Generalis clausula non porrigitur adea quaeantea specialiter sunt comprehensa. A general clause is not extended to include those things that havebeen previously provided for specially. Statutum generaliter est intelligendum quando verba statuti sunt specialia, ratio autem generalis. When the words of a statute are special, but the reason general, the statute is to be understood generally. Generalia praecedunt, specialia sequuntur. General matters precede, special matters follow. In generalibus versatur error. Error thrives in generalities. Fraus latet in generalibus. Fraud lies hidden in general expressions.
See also: broad, chief, collective, competitive, conventional, current, customary, familiar, generic, habitual, inaccurate, inclusive, inexact, liberal, mutual, national, nonsectarian, omnibus, open, ordinary, predominant, prevailing, prevalent, proverbial, public, regular, rife, routine, unspecified, usual, vague

AFFIRMANCE-DAY, GENERAL. In the English Court of Exchequer, is a day appointed by the judges of the common pleas, and barons of the exchequer, to be held a few days after the beginning of every term for the general affirmance or reversal of judgments. 2 Tidd. 1091.

DAMAGES, GENERAL, torts. General damages are such as the law implies to have accrued from the act of a tort-feasor. To call a man a thief, or commit an assault and battery upon his person, are examples of this kind. In the first case the law presumes that calling a man a thief must be injurious to him, with showing that it is so. Sir W. Jones, 196; 1 Saund. 243, b. n. 5; and in the latter case, the law implies that his person has been more or less deteriorated, and that the injured party is not required to specify what injury he has sustained, nor to prove it. Ham. N. P. 40; 1 Chit. Pl. 386; 2 L.R. 76; 4 Bouv. Inst. n. 3584.

GENERAL. This word has several meanings, namely: 1. A principal officer, particularly in the army. 2. Something opposed to special; as, a general verdict, the general issue, which expressions are used in contradistinction to special verdict, special issue. 3. Principal, as the general post office. 4. Not select, as a general ship. (q. v.) 5. Not particular, as a general custom. 6. Not limited, as general jurisdiction. 7. This word is sometimes annexed or prefixed to other words to express or limit the extent of their signification; as Attorney General, Solicitor General, the General Assembly, &c.

HEIR, GENERAL. Heir at common in the English law. The heir at common law is he who, after his father or ancestor's death has a right to, and is introduced into all his lands, tenements and hereditaments. He must be of the whole blood, not a bastard, alien, &c. Bac. Abr. Heir, B 2; Coparceners; Descent.

References in classic literature ?
It was growing late, and there was a general disposition to disband.
The deepest sounds of the retiring and invisible column had ceased to be borne on the breeze to the listeners, and the latest straggler had already disappeared in pursuit; but there still remained the signs of another departure, before a log cabin of unusual size and accommodations, in front of which those sentinels paced their rounds, who were known to guard the person of the English general.
The general was about to ask what these lashes were, and what was Dulcinea's disenchantment, when a sailor exclaimed, "Monjui signals that there is an oared vessel off the coast to the west.
Is the aggregate power of the general government greater than ought to have been vested in it?
A note was in consequence addressed to General de Quesnel, begging him to be present at the meeting next day, the 5th.
The general who does not understand these, may be well acquainted with the configuration of the country, yet he will not be able to turn his knowledge to practical account.
But the greatest misfortune that befell the English during the whole war was the repulse of General Abercrombie, with his army, from the ramparts of Ticonderoga in 1758.
But you will soon be in receipt of some," retorted the General, reddening a little as he dived into his writing desk and applied himself to a memorandum book.
Inexpugnable, in his wild and mountainous Scotland, an absolute general, king of an army of eleven thousand old soldiers, whom he had more than once led on to victory; as well informed, nay, even better, of the affairs of London, than Lambert, who held garrison in the city, -- such was the position of Monk, when, at a hundred leagues from London, he declared himself for the parliament.
When the general had satisfied his own curiosity, in a close examination of every well-known ornament, they proceeded into the library, an apartment, in its way, of equal magnificence, exhibiting a collection of books, on which an humble man might have looked with pride.
The general very nearly smiled, but thought better of it and kept his smile back.
A member of the Hofkriegsrath from Vienna had come to Kutuzov the day before with proposals and demands for him to join up with the army of the Archduke Ferdinand and Mack, and Kutuzov, not considering this junction advisable, meant, among other arguments in support of his view, to show the Austrian general the wretched state in which the troops arrived from Russia.