generalize

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generalize

verb assume, conclude, deal in generaliiies, discuss in the abstract, draw inferences, generatim, hypothesize, ignore distinctions, loqui, make a generalizaaion, suppose, surmise, theorize, universalize, universe
References in periodicals archive ?
These findings testify to the strength, validity and generalisability of the BFLPE and suggest that whether or not educational regions espouse ability segregation is of little consequence to its existence.
To gain a better understanding of the potential generalisability of our findings and to add to the understanding of the impact of financial crises (past and present) on the transition into early adulthood, we compare the role of these factors in different age cohorts who have both experienced a major economic recession at the time when they were reaching compulsory school leaving age.
Clearly, comparative work is required to more clearly establish the generalisability of our findings to other countries, sectors, and target markets.
This study was undertaken in one HEI in the UK and the findings are therefore limited in their generalisability.
The evaluations are also limited in their generalisability since they analysed pilot interventions (and extensions to those pilots, in the case of PtW).
The authors stress that the generalisability of their findings are limited by the observational and non-randomised nature of the study, and by potential differences in clinic practice and record keeping over time.
The influence of these factors was not explored in this study, limiting its generalisability.
In terms of generalisability, the findings of the study are not idiosyncratic and may be typical and transferable to other AEGI settings.
This has implications for the generalisability of the findings, although a number of them are consistent with those from previous research.
The present study included receptionists from government primary healthcare centres only, which limits the generalisability of findings to secondary and tertiary care facilities.
In addition, we recruited our cohort from physiotherapy departments, which may limit the generalisability of the study findings to the subset of people receiving physiotherapy intervention after ankle fracture.
Cooper (1998:43) states that generalisability is increased in integrative reviews containing articles conducted at different times, places, with varying samples of ages and races, as well as studies applying different methodologies.