generalize

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generalize

verb assume, conclude, deal in generaliiies, discuss in the abstract, draw inferences, generatim, hypothesize, ignore distinctions, loqui, make a generalizaaion, suppose, surmise, theorize, universalize, universe
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of clinical research, however, is to develop generalisable knowledge, which may or may not benefit the individual participant.
Also, unlike previous studies, this study had few exclusion criteria, making the results more generalisable and representative of our population (8).
The results may, therefore, not be generalisable to vertically infected young people transitioning into adult HIV care.
Although we believe our results are robust and generalisable there are two limitations that are worth noting.
Although the study was limited in that a convenience sample was used, and hence the results may not be generalisable to a larger area of India, it highlights a need for formal social resources such as social workers and agencies, to support parents of children with conditions of disability outside of the family.
The mathematical solution provides little insight into this particular form of reasoning however, a teacher might invite the class to explore the use of subtraction and the relative size of the terms in the ratios to determine whether the student's reasoning was plausible and generalisable.
Therefore, some of their motivations may not necessarily be readily generalisable to a wider and more diverse student body.
By its nature, this limits the level to which the findings are generalisable even within the populations from which the cohorts are drawn.
In addition to a number of limitations, the results are not generalisable because of the small numbers and for the following reasons.
Qualitative research is especially valuable when exploring uncomfortable, undiscussed or otherwise painful subject matter, enabling expeditions into such domains in an effective and sensitive manner, while identifying and sharing the salient elements of people's experiences in a way that offers a "ring of truth" that can be less discernable in larger, more generalisable, quantitative presentations.
Cook, Heath and Thompson, (2000) stress that the representativeness of response samples is more critical than the rate of response for deciding whether results are generalisable.