generic

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generic

adjective applicable to a class, blanket, broad, collective, common, comprehensive, general, inexact, nonexclusive, nonspecific, not particuuar, not special, sweeping, universal, unspecified, wide
Associated concepts: generic name, trade name, trademark
See also: broad, omnibus, unspecified
References in periodicals archive ?
Any credible analysis of generic dispensing at mail-service pharmacies compared to retail pharmacies must be based on the same set of drugs available generically at the same rate.
This doesn't mean the satirical novel is generically supreme; rather, the author is arguing that satire feeds upon other forms, exploiting their strengths and weaknesses for its own ends.
A generically handsome young man took my coat, and I wondered if it was in fact a pang of privileged guilt that I was experiencing.
Generically, this work is related to Company B and could be its prequel (is Taylor building a twentieth-century American epic?
actress Sandra Bullock recently wore Havaianas with an evening gown, and now the casual shoes--often generically called flip-flops in English because of the sound they make on your feet when walking--clack regularly down the fashion world's catwalks.
Kate Needham, Richmond's Marketing Director commented: "We know that our customers refer to our products generically as ice cream and so it seemed an obvious choice.
The electronic ticket, which is known generically as a "Smart Card", is a season ticket which can be swiped at station exit barriers to speed up passage.
Both Myfortic, known generically as mycophenolic acid, and CellCept, mycophenolate mofetil, are used to suppress the immune system to prevent patients' bodies from rejecting a transplanted organ.
It's close to that, but they can't get by just by being generically not Republican.
The medication, known generically as panitumumab, proved in clinical trials to prevent progression of tumors that have spread to other parts of the body in patients for whom chemotherapy failed.
News reports tend to describe Indonesia's violence as generically 'sectarian,' as if Moslem and Christian extremists were mutually responsible.