carrier

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carrier

n. in general, any person or business which transports property or people by any means of conveyance (truck, auto, taxi, bus, airplane, railroad, ship), almost always for a charge. The carrier is the transportation system and not the owner or operator of the system. There are two types of carriers: common carrier (in the regular business or a public utility of transportation) and a private carrier (a party not in the business, but agrees to make a delivery or carry a passenger in a specific instance). Regular transportation systems are regulated by states and by the Interstate Commerce Commission if they cross state lines. (See: common carrier, private carrier)

carrier

noun conveyor, dispatcher, express shipper, ferrier, shipper, steamship company, transferor, transport company
Associated concepts: air carriers, baggage, carrier by air, carrier engaged in interstate commerce, carrier for hire, carrier of goods, carrier of passengers, carrier's lien, common carriers, forwarding carriers, initial carriers, motor vehicle carrier, operrting carriers, private carriers, public carriers, railroad carriers
See also: bearer

carrier

see COMMON CARRIER, CARRIAGE BY ROAD.
References in periodicals archive ?
To support its genetic carrier screening capabilities, Good Start Genetics has a dedicated team of customer care specialists and board certified genetic counselors who provide step-by-step support, from test selection through results, analysis and reporting.
Since then genetic carrier screening for Ashkenazi diseases has increased.
Recently published in Genetics in Medicine, the journal of the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG), were results of a study that validated a new technique for detecting carriers and newborns with Fragile X syndrome--an important step forward in longstanding efforts to develop a better means of detecting genetic carriers of this disorder.
Genetic carrier testing of the mother had indicated she had a "balanced translocation" of chromosomes 11 and 22, which meant that while she was unaffected, there was a risk that her children could have an abnormal number of chromosomes.
About one in 6,000 babies is affected by the condition, with one in 40 parents thought to be a genetic carrier.
Suggested Topics for Integrating Genomics into Graduate Nursing Curricula (14,21) Course: REPRODUCTIVE AND SEXUAL HEALTH Suggested Genomic Topics: * Prenatal genetic family history risk assessment (ACOG screening questionnaire and three-generation pedigree) * Risk associated with advanced maternal age * Prenatal testing and diagnosis--testing methods, applicability, type of information * Genetic carrier screening for cystic fibrosis; other tests determined by ethnicity, such as sickle cell anemia, Tay-Sachs disease, and Canavan's disease * Prenatal drug/medication use and birth defects (e.