genetic

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genetic

adjective atavistic, congenital, hereditary, ingrained, inherited, innate
See also: born, hereditary, innate, native
References in periodicals archive ?
Roughly half the 32,000 single-letter changes in the genetic code known to be associated with human disease involve a change the other way, from G-C to A-T.
The Arbely group proposed to develop and apply such synthetic biology-based tools to modify the genetic code of cultured mammalian cells and bacteria with the aim to study the role of lysine acetylation in the regulation of metabolism and in cancer development.
For over 40 years we have assumed that DNA changes affecting the genetic code solely impact how proteins are made," Dr.
But, the ability to write a genetic code of organisms has immense potential to benefit humans as this would enable scientists to direct cells or organisms to perform desired jobs.
Prof Chinnery and his team will investigate which part of the mi-tochondrial DNA genetic code is responsible for the altered risk of developing Parkinson's.
He considers the formal inheritance of language and genes, how complex syntax can become, how the form of genetic code maps the form of linguistic code, linguistic texts and genomic strings, and other aspects.
Medicine would be revolutionised by having details of a patient's genetic code stored on computer.
As humans begin to tinker with the genetic code they are in effect assuming godlike powers.
The biocodes only fit together in certain ways, just like the parts of DNA, which holds the genetic code for all forms of life.
Thus began the race to map the genetic code that determines who we are, what we look like, how long we'll live, and what's in store for our children and grandchildren.
Researchers looked for 20 specific sequences of genetic code found more frequently in people of African descent than in those of European descent.
Codon: a specific sequence of 3 nucleotides (nucleic acid building blocks) that is part of a genetic code and denotes a particular amino acid in a protein chain; the sequence may also start or stop protein synthesis.