genetic

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genetic

adjective atavistic, congenital, hereditary, ingrained, inherited, innate
See also: born, hereditary, innate, native
References in periodicals archive ?
Chin and colleagues have now redesigned the cell's machinery so that it reads the genetic code in quadruplets.
Sequencing-By-Hybridization is a revolutionary technology designed to decipher the human genome -- all of the genes that comprise the human genetic code.
This FIBR project will inject a broad array of novel theory and experimental data into the debate on the origin of life, involving an integrated approach that brings together microbiology, geochemistry, physics, biochemistry, computer simulation and a modern understanding of complex dynamical systems to provide, for the first time, a coherent account of the evolution of metabolism and the development of the modern genetic code.
That "opens the possibility of adding multiple unnatural amino acids to the genetic code," says Christopher Anderson, one of the Scripps members who developed the organism.
The worm was the first multicellular organism to have its genetic code mapped, and this finding secured a Nobel prize for the trio of John Sulston, Bob Horvitz, and Sydney Brenner.
NEUGENES are synthetic compounds that mirror a critical portion of a disease-causing organism's genetic code and bind to specific portions of the target genetic sequence.
The cardinal difficulty in the origin of life is the inception of the genetic code.
The molecule, 16S rRNA, plays a role in the translation of the genetic code and thus is critical to the organisms.
Commentary from leading scientists in the field helps readers understand how deciphering our genetic code will revolutionize medicine while posing ethical dilemmas.
By unraveling the genetic code of phages, or bacterial viruses, Targanta has identified antimicrobial proteins used by the phages to kill or stop the growth of bacteria, as well as the specific bacterial targets with which those proteins interact.
Since that period, evolution has scrambled that creature's genetic code enough to produce two extraordinarily different species: Homo sapiens and Mus musculus, the common laboratory mouse.
To distinguish any synthesized viruses from lab contaminants, the investigators introduced subtle changes into the virus' genetic code that didn't alter the proteins it encodes.