genetic

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genetic

adjective atavistic, congenital, hereditary, ingrained, inherited, innate
See also: born, hereditary, innate, native
References in periodicals archive ?
Six out of 10 women without other genetic markers of ovarian cancer risk had the KRAS variant.
Registration of multiple-cotyledon red clover genetic marker stock: L38-1485.
The genetic marker we've identified deals with progression.
Our findings support that the KRAS-variant is an new genetic marker of ovarian cancer risk," she added.
Up to 20 seeds of this genetic marker may be obtained upon written request and agreement to return increased seed to the corresponding author.
However, advances in genome analysis (including the development of comprehensive sets of informative genetic markers, improved physical mapping methods, and novel techniques for transcript identification) have reduced the obstacles to discovery of novel host resistance genes.
All of the 115 wild plants that the researchers tested carried at least one genetic marker characteristic of the commercial plants.
NASDAQ: CLDA) announced today that its PGxHealth[TM] division, the provider of Therapeutic Diagnostics[TM], will present new data on the use of a replicated genetic marker in predicting the risk of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis (CIA) at the American Society of Hematology's 48th Annual Meeting and Exposition (ASH) in Orlando, Florida.
However, only several types of photosynthesizing plankton collected near Hawaii at depths of as much as 150 meters had this genetic marker, and they produced the active enzyme, says Zehr.
Inexpensive Test Using the P2X7 Genetic Marker Anticipated Within Two Years
Salisbury's presentation, data will be presented on the Company's successful studies on Clozapine-Induced Agranulocytosis (CIA) in which a genetic marker predictive of CIA was discovered and then replicated.
The neural stem cells, whose progeny were identifiable by means of a genetic marker previously slipped into them, engrafted as normal bone marrow transplants do and began producing blood cells.