genetic

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Related to genetic merit: genetic dictionary

genetic

adjective atavistic, congenital, hereditary, ingrained, inherited, innate
See also: born, hereditary, innate, native
References in periodicals archive ?
The observed EBVs indicate that genetic merit for high SCS (susceptibility to mastitis) in the first lactation of Holsteins is negligible but increases as lactation number progresses.
Michael Bishop, President and Chief Scientific Officer of Infigen, said that, "These clones demonstrate that Infigen's nuclear transfer cloning technology is a highly efficient, economical approach and a proven platform for propagating animals of high genetic merit.
Equally, if not more important, it offers the prospect of a secure, longer-term relationship with customers keen to acquire calves with known parentage and high genetic merit that will deliver faster growth rates and better conformation.
The average genetic merit of cows for milk yield in the period of 1983 to 1987, 1987 to 1997 and 1997 to 2006 was 13.
We are also using genetic mapping techniques to increase knowledge of the structure of dairy cows' genome and to develop technology to select animals based on true genetic merit.
Having invested heavily in genetic research and development for over four years, the genetic merit of its nucleus flock has moved forward apace and is now of world-class merit.
The title is presented to the English performance recorded flock within each breed that has shown the most impressive improvement in genetic merit over a 12-month period.
Genetic merit for daily milk yield, fat and protein content was predicted separately for each breed using the three-trait animal model based on repeated test-day observations and covariance structure included, accounting for mutual associations between the traits.
Most breed associations provide predictions of the genetic merit of individual animals, called Expected Progeny Difference, or EPD.
Once embryos of superior genetic merit have been identified, cloning technology will allow these embryos to be duplicated and to produce genetically identical cows that have superior performance capabilities.
These unknowns have numerous additional costs as well as genetic timelines associated with in finding an animal's true genetic merit.
Such high correlation might suggest a genetic merit of WW could be largely predicted by that of BW.