genetic

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genetic

adjective atavistic, congenital, hereditary, ingrained, inherited, innate
See also: born, hereditary, innate, native
References in periodicals archive ?
Producing high-quality pearls through family genetic selection remains one of the main challenges for future aquaculture development of Pinctada margaritifera.
Effects of genetic selection for milk yield on energy balance, levels of hormones, and metabolites in lactating cattle, and possible links to reduced fertility.
If alteration of the germ line is allowed for mitochondrial disease then it will certainly be requested for other diseases and also pave the way for improper use of the medicine and transformation of genetic selection into a real option, not forgetting the staggering societal impact of IVF.
According to Crews and Franke (1998), order correlation rates below 70% may indicate important changes in the classification of animals which may jeopardize genetic selection and progress.
Massmann will also deal with a number of important bull buying tips for commercial beef producers and reveal the latest genetic selection methods.
The fast growth and increased breast size has come from genetic selection in the breeder stocks; the superb rations these animals eat which are formulated using grains, meal, and vitamins; and the poultry houses being used (cost in excess of $400,000 each) today give the birds optimum temperatures and carefully controlled air quality which encourages fast growth.
The report is expected to analyze the impact of genetic selection on the welfare of broilers.
The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) launched, on 29 March, a new online public consultation on the welfare aspects of genetic selection in chickens raised specifically for meat production (broilers).
But long-term studies on genetic selection and linebreeding of cattle have been ongoing at ARS's Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory (LRRL) in Miles City, Montana, since 1934.
The average weight of a male turkey has increased from 28 to 40 pounds, due to genetic selection and disease control.
Improving gross and clover varieties by genetic selection provides a feed for ruminants that has a lower GHG cost of production.
Most studies of physical activity and obesity are usually limited by short follow-up periods and genetic selection bias, but here's a 30-year study of 16 twin pairs who were discordant for leisure time physical activity habits in 1975, and who remained so throughout the next 30 years.