Gentlewoman

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GENTLEWOMAN. This word is unknown to the law in the United States, and is but little used. In England. it was, formerly, a good addition of the state or degree of a woman. 2 Inst. 667.

References in periodicals archive ?
25) 'Afaf, Lutfi al-Sayyid Marsot, 'The Revolutionary Gentlewomen in Egypt', in Women in the Muslim World, Louise, Beck and Nikki, Keddie (eds.
And John Murrell's A Daily Exercise for Ladies and Gentlewomen counsels its reader how to make marzipan snakes, snails, frogs, roses, cherries, shoes, slippers, keys, knives, gloves, buttons, beads, chains, and letters to create their own surprising and dramatic spectacles (Flv--F4).
These dapper-suited gentlewomen bring their intensely beautiful, poetic and wryly observant take on the human condition to the contemporary folk scene.
During these trips, she studied the care provided and, later on in her work at the Institute for the Care of Sick Gentlewomen in London, where she acquired administrative skills (McDonald, 2001).
It was big enough - just - to cope with every man-jack of the media last Wednesday morning, when the gentlemen and gentlewomen of the press pressed into close proximity on their annual jaunt to trainer Paul Nicholls' festival open morning.
And so "her honesty was saved" and the only peoplewho saw her were her husband, those riding with him and Godiva's gentlewomen.
While Queen Victoria presided over the Empire, an army of young, single, and impoverished gentlewomen governed the nurseries of England's rising middle class.
Not only did respectable gentlewomen run the risk of consorting with prostitutes (a popular book of etiquette advised female travelers to keep a safe distance from any broad with "a meretricious expression of eye"), but extended time away from the joys of cooking and cleaning might ruin them for life.
In Reflections upon Marriage Astell emphasized a woman's need to choose well in marriage precisely because she must yield to her husband's rule, while in A Serious Proposal she argued that gentlewomen unable or disinclined to marry, as she herself was, should have the freedom to develop their minds in a community of women.
But Gentlewomen, because you shal not enter into colorick conceites against me, for publishing in this presence, a hystorie whiche seemeth so mutch to sounde to the shame of your sexe, I meane not to insiste the truth of it, but rather will proue it false.
This fast-growing tendency among gentlewomen causes so much instability, as, in the process of pursing their "love" may reject the necessity of seeking a marriage contract with a gentlemen of at least equal title.
A CENTURY-OLD Coventry charity set up to help "elderly gentlewomen living in reduced circumstances" has money to give away.