goods


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to goods: Goods and services

Goods

Items; chattels; things; any Personal Property.

Goods is a term of flexible context and meaning and extends to all tangible items.

goods

n. items held for sale in the regular course of business, as in a retail store.

goods

noun appurtenances, articles of commerce, assets, belongings, chattels, commodities, consumer durables, durables, effects, items, materials, paraphernalia, personal estate, possessions, produce, products, property, resources, staples, stock, stock-in-trade, supplies, things for sale, vendibles
Associated concepts: bulk sale, chattels, foreign goods, goods and chattels, goods sold and delivered, personalty, sale of goods, special goods, tangible goods
See also: assets, cargo, commodities, effects, estate, freight, merchandise, movable, paraphernalia, possession, possessions, property, stock in trade

goods

1 for the purposes of the Sales of Goods Act 1979, ‘goods’ include ‘emblements, industrial growing crops and things attached or forming part of the land that are agreed to be severed before sale or under the contract of sale’. For the purposes of the law of Scotland, ‘goods’ are defined by the Act as all corporeal moveables. Specifically excluded, however, is money- unless it is bought as a curiosity, as in the case of gold Jubilee pieces.
2 in the law of the EUROPEAN UNION the word has a special definition in relation to the operation of the customs union and in particular in the provisions relating to the free movement of goods. It covers industrial and agricultural products regardless of whether they come from member states or are imported from other states, and it is this inclusion of imports that makes a customs union different and more substantial than a free trade area. The important focus is upon products that can be valued in money that can be the subject ofa commercial transaction.

GOODS, property. For some purposes this term includes money, valuable securities, and other mere personal effects. The term. goods and chattels, includes not only personal property in possession, but also choses in action. 12 Co. 1; 1 Atk. 182. The term chattels is more comprehensive than that of goods, and will include all animate as well as inanimate property, and also a chattel real, as a lease for years of house or land. Co. Litt. 118; 1 Russ. Rep. 376. The word goods simply and without qualification, will pass the whole personal estate when used in a will, including even stocks in the funds. But in general it will be limited by the context of the will. Vide 2 Supp. to Ves. jr. 289; 1 Chit. Pr. 89, 90; 1. Ves. jr. 63; Hamm. on Parties, 182; 3 Ves. 212; 1 Yeates, 101; 2 Dall. 142; Ayl. Pand. 296; Wesk. Ins. 260; 1 Rop. on Leg. 189; 1 Bro. C. C. 128; Sugd. Vend. 493, 497; and the articles Biens; Chattels; Furniture.
     2. Goods are said to be of different kinds, as adventitious, such as are given or arise otherwise than by succession; dotal goods, or those which accrue from a dowry, or marriage portion; vacant goods, those which are abandoned or left at large.

References in classic literature ?
SOCRATES: Then, my dear friend, how can you know whether a thing is good or bad of which you are wholly ignorant?
Any Athenian gentleman, taken at random, if he will mind him, will do far more good to him than the Sophists.
What say you to resting a space and eating and drinking good health with me.
said the cook, who loved good fare as well as a good fight; and they both laid by their swords and fell to the food with hearty will.
Then to them the good will be enemies and the evil will be their friends?
And in that case they will be right in doing good to the evil and evil to the good?
So after Good had rested a while, and we had drunk our fill of the water, which was sweet and fresh, and washed our faces, that needed it sadly, as well as we could, we started from the banks of this African Styx, and began to retrace our steps along the tunnel, Good dripping unpleasantly in front of us.
A squeeze, a struggle, and Sir Henry was out, and so was Good, and so was I, dragging Foulata's basket after me; and there above us were the blessed stars, and in our nostrils was the sweet air.
He was young, and had a bad name for shying and starting, by which he had lost a good place.
I was timid when I was young, and was a good deal frightened several times, and if I saw anything strange I used to turn and look at it -- you see, with our blinkers one can't see or understand what a thing is unless one looks round -- and then my master always gave me a whipping, which of course made me start on, and did not make me less afraid.
So, in all that year, fivescore or more good stout yeomen gathered about Robin Hood, and chose him to be their leader and chief.
Now he met a fair buxom lass in a shady lane, and each gave the other a merry word and passed their way; now he saw a fair lady upon an ambling pad, to whom he doffed his cap, and who bowed sedately in return to the fair youth; now he saw a fat monk on a pannier-laden ass; now a gallant knight, with spear and shield and armor that flashed brightly in the sunlight; now a page clad in crimson; and now a stout burgher from good Nottingham Town, pacing along with serious footsteps; all these sights he saw, but adventure found he none.