gradual

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gradual

(Slow), adjective by degrees, continuous, creeping, gradational, graduated, in steps, leisurely, methodical, orderly, paced, progressive, regular, slow, step-by-step, systematic
See also: deliberate
References in periodicals archive ?
Gradualness implies action, and is not a polite name for standstill" (Bombay Plan: 26, 68, 84-85, 101; Pigou, 1937: 137-39).
English society was more integrated, more London-oriented, and its blend between a code of good manners and a code of morals shows, according to Elias, "the gradualness of the resolution of conflicts between upper and middle classes.
In considering the principle of gradualness in the divine salvific plan, one asks what possibilities are given to married couples who experience the failure of their marriage, or rather how it is possible to offer them Christ's help through the ministry of the Church," the document continues later.
The gradualness of the process seems to be corroborated by the fact that it was not until the end of the 12th century that the s-plural declension had been extended to all declensional classes in the North and North Midland (Roedler 1916: 451; cf.
Throughout Gerdil's practical considerations, the pedagogical values identified by the Italian scholar, Carlo Corsetti are evident: self-conscious respect for the rhythms of natural growth, a sure sense of what are the indispensable tools of the intellect, a pedagogy and curriculum that respects gradualness and continuity in systematic development, and an unmistakable seriousness of educational purpose.
Via the inevitability of gradualness, we learn the grim details of the Munchausen syndrome, buried under layers of 'mendacity', and Indie is able to distinguish the scars from the 'accidents' of her life, to put to rest the deceased members of her family and start anew.
This psychological process provides the requisite empirical evidence for theological categories such as the virtue of Christian hope, the law of gradualness, and the need for ongoing conversion.
But just as the first breath drawn by a child after its long, quiet nourishment breaks the gradualness of merely quantitative growth--there is a qualitative leap, and the child is born--so likewise the Spirit in its formation matures slowly and quietly into its new shape, dissolving bit by bit the structure of its previous world, whose tottering state is only hinted at by isolated symptoms .
In the pastoral treatment of the married, pastors should hold fast to the law of gradualness.