Grandfather

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GRANDFATHER, domestic relations. The father of one's father or mother. The father's father is called the paternal grandfather; the mother's father is the maternal grandfather.

References in classic literature ?
My tribe is the grandfather of nations, but I am an unmixed man.
Then I will provide for you all without farther delay--Here are 4 Banknotes of 50L each--Take them and remember I have done the Duty of a Grandfather.
The king your father and the king your grandfather never lost their temper except when under the protection of their own palace.
He spoke in that refined French in which our grandfathers not only spoke but thought, and with the gentle, patronizing intonation natural to a man of importance who had grown old in society and at court.
He had seen his children grow to manhood and womanhood and become fathers and grandfathers, mothers and grandmothers.
Here's where you put it over on your husbands, brothers, sons, fathers, and grandfathers.
Finally they called Big Baby Peter and Little Baby Isaac, after the two grandfathers, and had them both christened together.
Musing on the strangeness of life, and on the invariable ultimate triumph of the insignificant and small over the important and vast, illustrated in this instance by the easy substitution in the arbour of slugs for grandfathers, I went slowly round the next bend of the path, and came to the broad walk along the south side of the high wall dividing the flower garden from the kitchen garden, in which sheltered position my father had had his choicest flowers.
The way will be this:--dating from the day of the hymeneal, the bridegroom who was then married will call all the male children who are born in the seventh and tenth month afterwards his sons, and the female children his daughters, and they will call him father, and he will call their children his grandchildren, and they will call the elder generation grandfathers and grandmothers.
Some of my family, for aught I know, might ride in their coaches, when the grandfathers of some voke walked a-voot.
what a pair we must have made, going double like old grandfathers, stumbling like babes, and as white as dead folk.
And with them, here and there, undisguised by their decent American clothing, smaller in bulk and stature, weazened not alone by age but by the pinch of lean years and early hardship, were grandfathers and mothers who had patently first seen the light of day on old Irish soil.