grumpy

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Wrapping paper all over the floor, toy boxes strewn around the room and children staring grumpily at their father who is selfishly using the sole Xbox controller.
Then again, maybe maths really isn't her strong point-which may help explain why Panorama is now just a neutered Watchdog, grumpily licking the scars where its journalistic colones used to be.
It's just like being back in school," a gallerygoer muttered grumpily, upon entering Gujarati artist Atul Dodiya's latest, much anticipated solo show, "Bako Exists.
Watching Daniel Craig and Harrison Ford grumpily promoting "Cowboys & Aliens" served as a vivid reminder that the superstar press junket is itself a sad anachronism.
Grumpily and grudgingly I admitted it was a whole lot of fun.
During an Air Canada flight from New York on our way to Stratford in 1982, I tried to get his advice, which he grumpily refused to give.
Imagine Abu Hamza writing on board Imagine hook-handed militant cleric Abu Hamza grumpily having to write the line "Some aspects of Western life are actually quite admirable" on a blackboard 50 times WITHOUT CHALK, while Janet Street-Porter sings Delibes''s Flower Duet* with a Dalek.
Later on, he grumpily noted that "this is a PiL gig - you can make noise.
Gail Yonov and Mary-Lou Moulton passed the basket and I bought six tickets, but grumpily went home without it.
The conservative blogger Andrew Sullivan once grumpily lamented the rise of "the iPod people.
Jeffrey Sammons gives an overview of the novelistic production of the time and grumpily (and with style) complains about how the so-called Bildungsroman continues to take up undue consideration in literary histories of the period at the expense of the much more common social novel that is more in line with other European traditions.
In one note of dissent, Larry Rivers once called Porter's paintings "flat-footed" To me, in the present show, the), appear to shuffle through the Amherst quadrangle with a copy of William Shawn's New Yorker grumpily rolled under one elbow-patched arm.