habitual criminal


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habitual criminal

n. under the statutes of many states, a person who has been convicted of either two or three felonies (or of numerous misdemeanors), a fact which may increase punishment for any further criminal convictions.

References in periodicals archive ?
There is a far better reason for the Hayes decision: The defendant was simply not being punished for his refusal to plea bargain; he was being punished for violating the Habitual Criminal Act.
Indicted as a habitual criminal, he is facing a minimum mandatory sentence of 171/2 years' imprisonment if convicted.
uk A HABITUAL criminal who was told by a judge that he had entered the "Premier League of burglary" after his latest break-in has been jailed for three and a half years.
It is obvious from his past offending that Whyte is a habitual criminal and the fact he continued drug dealing after receiving a substantial prison term shows he has no regard for the law.
According to police, deceased father was a habitual criminal and a cruel person; the girl killed him to save her honour.
If Mr Saatchi is telling the truth, then Miss Lawson is a habitual criminal.
If a licensing authority is satisfied, after giving the holder of a driving licence an opportunity of being heard, that he is a habitual criminal or habitual drunkard, it can disqualify the person from holding a driving licence," the law reads.
was indicted March 20 on two counts of armed robbery, six counts of unarmed robbery and a single count of assault and battery, all as a habitual criminal.
Brian was a habitual criminal - a recidivist is the official label of such a person - and at the age of 55 he had become so bitter at the world and even at himself.
He added that if Stchi was telling the truth then Lawson was a habitual criminal.
THERE is something unpalatable in general about crimes committed against elderly and vulnerable people, but the robbery attempt by habitual criminal Samantha Smith touched a new low.