have recourse to


Also found in: Idioms.
See: employ
References in classic literature ?
At the same time that he refused the colonel's demand he made up his mind that he must have recourse to artifice when leaving Orel, to induce the Italian officer to accept some money of which he was evidently in need.
In his account of the mission, where his veracity is most to be suspected, he neither exaggerates overmuch the merits of the Jesuits, if we consider the partial regard paid by the Portuguese to their countrymen, by the Jesuits to their society, and by the Papists to their church, nor aggravates the vices of the Abyssins; but if the reader will not be satisfied with a Popish account of a Popish mission, he may have recourse to the history of the church of Abyssinia, written by Dr.
They are compelled, therefore, to have recourse to those houses whose history contains moving incidents like these.
This must not be," I thought I heard him say: "either he must listen to reason, or I must have recourse to the last resource of civilization.
The weaker States or confederacies would first have recourse to them, to put themselves upon an equality with their more potent neighbors.
Indeed, it seems that in defining contraries of every kind men have recourse to a spatial metaphor, for they say that those things are contraries which, within the same class, are separated by the greatest possible distance.
Oubliettes are employed as a means of kingly vengeance, and a low-born fellow such as he is would not have recourse to them.