heedlessness


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Healy, citing Brian Vickers, notes the decadence and corruption of the wood, regarding the retirement to the wood by the poetic "I" in a classical context, an example of the vices of inertia and luxuria, while the "careless" treading on gelid strawberries suggests the moral heedlessness of the narrator (179).
The Hanafi and Shafi'i scholars say that if one divides the night up into three thirds, and he stands (in prayer) for one third and sleeps the other two thirds, then the middle third is better than the first and last, because people's heedlessness and unmindfullness during this period are more complete and more entrenched, and worship during this period is much better and the number of people praying during this period is less.
As per the statistics mentioned in a media report, as many as 19 innocent people have lost their lives due to the heedlessness of the police for which at least 21,987 cases pertaining to inefficient performance and alleged involvement in corruption have also been registered against them.
When the narrator (whose own temporal positioning is sufficiently unclear) demonstrates the outlandish cartographic details relating to the atlas, his heedlessness to spatio-temporal fixities and distinctiveness is eminently seeable.
An attempt requires a purpose to accomplish a criminal end, but, by definition, a crime of recklessness involves heedlessness rather than purpose.
Few poets today can rival the unstoppered perversity and brilliant heedlessness of Ronaldo V.
Inexperienced Saudi officials' ignorance and heedlessness towards Muslims and Islamic countries' interests, and utilizing the capacities of a Muslim world nation for destroying and killing Muslims is a surprising and an unacceptable approach," he added.
If they continue in their heedlessness despite these disasters, then this will lead them to Hell.
Cowdrey claims that the South "tended to exalt, sometimes with a special anarchic heedlessness, the contemporary American standard of exploitation without limit" (83).
That heedlessness has a cost: Sarah (Amy Landecker) spends much of the season lost and unmoored, and it's hard to watch Ali (Gaby Hoffmann) run roughshod over the emotions of a new lover.
Furthermore, he comfortably sat in the Cabinet side-by-side with those who wore the mask of heedlessness and shamelessness after hundreds of miners were sacrificed to the greed for more money in Soma and Ermenek.