hold

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Related to held harmless: Hold Harmless Agreement

hold

(Decide), verb abjudge, abjudicate, ascertain, come to a conclusion, conclude, decide legally, decree, find, fix, judge, make a decision, pass judgment, propound, resolve, rule, settle

hold

(Possess), verb assume authority, assume command, be accorded, be heir to, be in possession of, be masser of, be offered, be possessed of, be proffered, be vouchhafed, bear the responsibility of, care for, cling to, collect, command, conserve, control, devolve upon, direct, exercise direction over, fill a post, gather, get control, get possession of, grasp, habere, have, have a firm grip on, have a title to, have absolute disposal of, have as property, have by inheritance, have by tenure, have claim upon, have in hand, have in one's possession, have inherited, have rights to, have the care of, have the charge of, have the direction of, have title to, have under control, hold fast, hold in one's grasp, impropriate, inherit, keep, keep as one's own, keep for, keep in hand, keep in readiness, keep in reserve, keep on, keep prepared, lay aside, lay away, not dispose of, not part with, occupy, own, possidere, preserve, receive, retain, save, secure, set apart, set aside, take authorrty, take command, take over, tenere, wield restraint over
Associated concepts: adverse holding, hold in due course, hostile holding
See also: accommodate, adjudge, advantage, apprehend, arrest, chamber, claim, comprise, conclude, confine, conserve, consist, constrain, contain, contend, decide, deem, delay, depository, desist, detain, determine, dominance, dominion, embrace, encompass, engross, find, grapple, halt, handcuff, immerse, immure, imprison, include, influence, judge, keep, lock, maintain, moratorium, obtain, occupy, opine, own, possess, power, primacy, remain, reserve, restrain, retain, retention, rule, save, seisin, sentence, shelter, stay, stop, store, suspect, think, withhold

TO HOLD. These words are now used in a deed to express by what tenure the grantee is to have the land. The clause which commences with these words is called the tenendum. Vide Habendum; Tenendum.
     2. To hold, also means to decide, to adjudge, to decree; as, the court in that case held that the husband was not liable for the contract of the wife, made without his express or implied authority.
     3. It also signifies to bind under a contract, as the obligor is held and firmly bound. In the constitution of the United States, it is provided, that no person held to service or labor in one state under the laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labor, but shall be delivered up on the claim of the party to whom such service or labor may be due. Art. 4, sec. 3, Sec. 3; 2 Serg. & R. 306; 3 Id. 4; 5 Id. 52; 1 Wash. C. C. R. 500; 2 Pick. 11; 16 Pet. 539, 674.

References in periodicals archive ?
In this regard, it likely will become common for firms to include language in client engagement letters to the effect that the firm (i) reserves sole discretion to decide whether the transaction is a RT subject to the list maintenance and MA information return requirements; and (ii) shall be held harmless for additional tax liability, penalties or other financial damage that may result to the taxpayer from any furnishing of information pursuant to such requirements.
Hold Harmless Agreements or Clauses in contracts usually state that one party--most often the party writing or controlling the contract--be held harmless by the second party for any tort liability of the first party that arises out of the business activity referenced in the contract.
The contract also included a "broad 'hold harmless'" agreement, which stated that Dow "shall in no event be liable for, but shall be held harmless by [the United States] against, any damage to or destruction of property .
It is astonishing that Old Republic would argue that it should not be liable because it issued bonds for a company so that the company could engage in an unlawful enterprise and then argue that it should be held harmless because the enterprise turned out to be unlawful," Turner said.