high-minded

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Rampant morality, unchecked high-mindedness, runaway rules-compliance .
But there are many others that don't share this high-mindedness.
It was all the more ludicrous, of course, given the party's high-mindedness on insisting on One Member, One Vote in other aspects of its internal working.
Whether Democrats are crippled by a bizarre high-mindedness or a craven desire to protect some of their own ethically challenged members, the pointlessness of an ethics campaign that no one actually pushes should be obvious.
The Babylonian marriage market represents a peculiarly Victorian combination of the edifying (based on a passage in Herodotus and scrupulous archaeological research) with the titillating, and of high-mindedness with a sharp eye for the main chance.
nurture, for example, we read on folio 25b, "The wise man boasts of his high-mindedness, not of rotting bones," alluding to his accomplishments rather than his lineage.
She sees these instances as signalling a combination of American exceptionalism and high-mindedness where imperial appropriation was presented as a liberation whereby civilization was conferred on the former colony.
Onto such a bright landscape of detente and rapprochement some rain must fall, however, and Stockley describes how such international high-mindedness fell victim to political realities, especially for Shelburne.
But the incident only illustrated what should have been clear in any case, which is that the official fiction of journalistic "objectivity" and high-mindedness has bred in the editorial staff of the Times--among other writers and editors--a bedrock conviction of their own infallibility.
Charlotte Bronte launched a new style of a heroine in Jane Eyre-a young woman with neither beauty nor fortune who wins a husband through wit, high-mindedness and integrity.
Fusseil wrote about the tendency of reporters and editors to accentuate the positive, speak with one voice, adopt a posture of high-mindedness, and assert, in early stages, that war would be "fast-moving, mechanized, remote-controlled, and perhaps even rather easy.
She urges "general civility" in all of her novels, but without resorting to the strident tones that make a writer "choke on [her] own high-mindedness.

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