high-minded

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For all Heath's high-mindedness, however, it didn't stop him giving peerages and knighthoods to his chums.
The king is shown dressed in the regalia of the Order of the Garter, his upward-gaze conveying an image of high-mindedness.
We call on them, Democrats and Republicans, to come together in a show of bipartisan high-mindedness and propose a harsh censuring of the president that establishes a precedent and ends the destructive debate on impeachment.
Yet for all the high-mindedness, the actual product of this approach tended towards conceptual flatulence and simplistic cheerleading for democracy.
She smiles poignantly or indulgently at the high-mindedness that determined her life.
The Valley's high-mindedness comes into play time and again, as residents rise to shoulder the burden left by a stymied City Council and a befuddled bureaucracy.
Long depleted of family cash, Dia's high-mindedness has now been salvaged--thanks to heroic fund-raising efforts--by enormous infusions of money from private benefactors and foundations (this, in turn, has further inspired some substantial public support).
For the elected commission to consider working hand-in-hand, or possibly merging, with the appointed panel is at best a gesture of enormous goodwill and high-mindedness - even if it also has roots in practical considerations about getting the necessary resources for the elected commission to accomplish its work.
There is, too, the long development of a certain high-mindedness, a humorlessness, a pulverization of delight that stamps a particular kind of European, male, heterosexual artist making figurative paintings against the prevailing grain.
10 at Kempton at 9-2, but the slip said 5-1 and I pointed this out to the bookmaker, not out of any high-mindedness but because I was not sure of the new rules.
Their crowd consists of the German-Jewish Ochs-Sulzberger dynasty that has owned The New York Times since 1896, whose lifestyle, high-mindedness, industriousness, and other social habits conform faithfully to the Our Crowd template.
The Times reported that "with colleges today increasingly viewed as employment credentialing stations, students as customers and learning for its own sake as a quaint idea whose time has passed, the University of Chicago finds itself a victim of its own high-mindedness and in a painful identity crisis.

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