High

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Related to higher: higher education

HIGH. This word has various significations: 1. Principal or chief, as high constable, high sheriff. 2. Prominent, in a bad sense, as high treason. 3. Open, not confined, as high seas.

References in periodicals archive ?
Tam took higher at Brechin, Dundee United, Inverness and Rangers.
Higher ed "will be an important topic in public policy discussions at the federal and state levels," said a statement from the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU).
College costs are now forcing even the neediest students to borrow, while middle-income families are in danger of being priced out of our public higher education systems.
Of the 396,441 women in the sample, 82% delivered vaginally and 18% by cesarean in their first pregnancy Compared with the proportion among women who had had a vaginal delivery, higher proportions of those with a previous cesarean had 12 or more years of education (86% vs.
Seventy percent said 2005 camper weeks were equal to or higher than last year.
As consumption patterns change, many paper machines are being converted to higher value grades.
The addition of carbon black is expected to increase the chain scission, due to higher mixing temperature and increased shear stress, and this is countered by increased carbon black/rubber interaction.
Ever increasing communications flows are driving demand for higher output power in the amplifying devices used in base stations for terrestrial and satellite microwave communications.
Keywords: welfare reform, higher education, public assistance, welfare recipients, organizing, political culture
Developing at a higher density offers the best solution for managing growth and protecting the environment by placing growth in areas already developed with basic infrastructure instead of pushing it further out from the core community.
Overall, the prevalence of having rarely or never worn seat belts was higher among male (21.
But, the Court declined to explain when other higher education institutions could use affirmative action to secure the educational benefits flowing from a racially and ethnically diverse student body.